Recent Blog Articles

Medications for Parkinson’s disease

June 01, 2006

Because the loss of dopamine in the brain is the fundamental problem of Parkinson’s disease, treatment is focused on replacing dopamine to help counter the loss of motor function. Dopamine loss is not the only mechanism involved; finding other, still-unknown factors is a major challenge facing researchers. Until we have the answers, however, drug makers will continue to design medications aimed at helping the brain replace the missing dopamine.

When symptoms warrant treatment, your neurologist will consider several types of medications to reduce tremor and ease movements.

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