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Is there a test for Alzheimer’s disease?

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Published: September 27, 2019

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Comments

Janet
October 16, 2019

Thanks for this article. I was a volunteer for several studies on Alzheimer’s disease for 21 years at NYU. Research included complete physical, neurological and psychological exams, spinal taps, mri’s, pet scans, sleep studies and included 3 days of cognitive testing, every 1 1/2 years. I have Alzheimer’s on both sides of my family, and a double ApoE 4.
After 21 years I was told I was no longer eligible for their studies. I am hoping my data is not sitting in a file somewhere and is being shared for furthering research.
At 61, I was left to figure out my own path toward preventing or stalling this disease.
I am participating with some cognitive testing at a local hospital’s Memory Disorder Clinic.
Really pray all researchers in this field of dementia worldwide, work together!
Time is running out for many of us!

Vairavan Premakumar
October 04, 2019

Really useful informations. We can imagine the test of Alzheimer’s in present and future. Healthy life style such as Aerobic exercise , Mediyerranean -style diet , keeping mind active are good to avoid Alzheimer’s disease.
What about the consuming much of alcohol and smoking to get the above disease?
Thanks

Daniel Matz
September 28, 2019

Shouldn’t the proper amount of good sleep be included in prevention section?

Amber Hussein Obeid
September 27, 2019

Lot of thanks for These important informations

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