Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Health advice for 2017: Simplify, simplify

Simple approaches are likely to be the most effective in maintaining good health. Experts now advise a healthy eating pattern over counting calories or individual nutrients, walking for exercise, and using soap and water for preventing infections. (Locked) More »

Pill-free ways to lower high blood pressure

Taking medication to treat high blood pressure is just part of the solution. Doctors say lifestyle modification is equally important. Losing weight may lower both systolic and diastolic pressure an average of one point for each pound of weight lost. Getting 30 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise on most days has the potential to lower systolic blood pressure as much as four to nine points. Other modifications include eating a heart-healthy diet, reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol, and managing stress. (Locked) More »

Say cheese?

Even though dairy products such as cheese, yogurt, and milk contain saturated fat, they don’t seem to pose a risk to heart health. Other nutrients found in dairy products, such as calcium and potassium, which may help lower blood pressure, may explain the observation. But some nutrition experts recommend choosing low-fat milk and yogurt and not eating too much cheese. Replacing dairy fat with plant-based unsaturated fat appears to be a healthier choice.  More »

Where the worst type of fat is hiding in supermarket foods

Trans fats are found in many processed foods, such as pastries, crackers, breakfast cereal, and soup. But the Nutrition Facts label can show zero trans fat if there is less than half a gram per serving. To detect trans fat in food, one should look at a food’s ingredient list and look for partially hydrogenated oils, which are trans fats. Some foods that contain trans fat may be surprising, such as frozen fish fillets, cappuccino mixes, and even seasoned bread crumbs.  (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Best protein: animals or plants?

Men need about 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body weight every day. Animal products contain some of the highest amounts, but many sources also include high levels of saturated fat and cholesterol. Plant proteins might be a healthier choice since they also include essential vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients. (Locked) More »

How to cut back on sugar and salt

Guidelines recommend limiting sugar to 10% of calories and sodium to 2,300 milligrams per day. Avoiding sweetened beverages and processed and packaged foods is key to reducing intake. Using spices and eating whole fruits can ease cravings for both salt and sugar. (Locked) More »