Exercise & Fitness

Exercising regularly, every day if possible, is the single most important thing you can do for your health. In the short term, exercise helps to control appetite, boost mood, and improve sleep. In the long term, it reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, depression, and many cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following:

For adults of all ages

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or 75 minutes of rigorous exercise like running (or an equivalent mix of both) every week.  It’s fine to break up exercise into smaller sessions as long as each one lasts at least 10 minutes.
  • Strength-training that works all major muscle groups—legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms—at least two days a week.  Strength training may involve lifting weights, using resistance bands, or exercises like push-ups and sit-ups, in which your body weight furnishes the resistance.

For pregnant women

The guidelines for aerobic exercise are considered safe for most pregnant women. The CDC makes no recommendation for strength training. It’s a good idea to review your exercise plan with your doctor.

For children

At least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, most of which should be devoted to aerobic exercise. Children should do vigorous exercise and strength training, such as push-ups or gymnastics, on at least three days every week.

Exercise & Fitness Articles

3 trends worth tapping into

There is increasing evidence that three trends—wearing an activity tracker, shopping at farmers’ markets, and practicing mindfulness—can have long-lasting health benefits. More »

Could occupational therapy enhance your quality of life?

It appears that four healthy habits—getting 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, maintaining a body mass index between 18.5 and 27.5, no smoking, and drinking only in moderation—may prevent many cancer cases and death in white people. (Locked) More »

Dance your way to better heart health?

Regular, moderate-intensity dancing may lower the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease. Aside from the exercise benefits, dancing is often a lifelong habit and provides stress-lowering social connections.  More »

Does regular exercise reduce cancer risk?

It appears people with the highest levels of physical activity have lower rates of cancer of the esophagus, lung, kidney, colon, head and neck, rectum, bladder and breast, compared with people with the lowest levels of physical activity. (Locked) More »

Need a quick brain boost? Take a walk

A 20-to-30-minute bout of moderate exercise before performing mental tasks may quicken reaction speed and sharpen decision making in people of all ages. A dose of caffeine may have similar effects. (Locked) More »

Make a home gym work for you

Making physical activity a habit takes determination and perseverance no matter what the setting. People who find time and convenience the main obstacles to getting to the gym may benefit from creating a simple workout area at home. Inexpensive items such as small hand and leg weights, portable pedaling machines, resistance bands, and a foam floor mat are perfect for a beginner’s needs. The dedicated exerciser may decide to invest in a professional-quality treadmill or other aerobic machine, or a home gym weight system. (Locked) More »

Step lively with walking

Walking tends to be unappreciated as adequate exercise. But approached the right way, at a certain speed and pace, it can be a primary form of fitness and possibly reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. (Locked) More »