Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Recharge your sexual energy

Men’s sexual drive can stay high late in life, but often their energy for sex gradually diminishes because of low testosterone levels, erectile dysfunction, poor sleep, or lack of exercise. Addressing these issues with their doctor and communicating with their partner to find mutual satisfaction can lead to increased sexual energy and intimacy. More »

Tai chi: A kinder, gentler approach to cardiac rehab?

Tai chi is a gentle exercise that involves a series of flowing movements and breath awareness. It may be a good alternative for people who decline to participate in cardiac rehabilitation, particularly if they think the exercise aspect of rehab will be too tiring or difficult. Tai chi is less physically demanding than many other forms of exercise and may also help lower stress. Regular practice may also modestly lower blood pressure and benefit people with heart failure, who tend to be tired and weak as a result of the heart’s diminished pumping ability. More »

Don’t let the cold put a freeze on your daily workout schedule

Many people skip workouts in the winter because of the chilly weather. But winter can be a great time to get outside and exercise, provided a person dresses warmly and finds the right strategies. It is also a good time to try a new activity or to join a community center or fitness club. (Locked) More »

If exercise feels like work, make it more like a game

Making exercise more fun by introducing aspects from games may help encourage people to be more physically active. This “gamification” helps motivate people through collaboration, competition, and team spirit. For example, members of families who turned their daily step counts into a competition boosted their daily walking distance by almost one mile, or more than twice as much as families who didn’t gamify their exercise routine. (Locked) More »

The skinny on fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is a dangerous and often difficult to detect condition. The disease affects up to 25% of American adults, 60% of whom are men, and raises a person’s risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, adopting a proper exercise routine and making dietary changes can reduce a person’s risk, and, in someone diagnosed with the disease, even reverse its effects. (Locked) More »

What to look for in a home treadmill

Home treadmill options are varied. Harvard experts recommend shopping for a home treadmill with a strong motor, a deck long enough for your stride, a sturdy frame and side rails, an emergency stop button, gauges that are easy to read, and buttons that are easy to use. Other options to consider include a built-in TV screen and compatibility with heart rate monitors. A person should try out a treadmill before buying it and make sure the treadmill comes with a warranty that includes servicing the motor. (Locked) More »