Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

3 simple strategies to get the most from your yoga class

Not all yoga classes are created equal. Participants should find the right class and instructor for their needs. A little diligence in choosing the right class and making sure the instructor is aware in advance of any pain or medical conditions can help ensure a good experience. (Locked) More »

Feel the beat of heart rate training

Guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. A good way to maintain moderate intensity is with heart rate training, in which a person exercises at 60% to 75% of maximum heart rate. By wearing a heart rate monitor while exercising, a person can have a constant reminder of exercise intensity, so he or she can stay in the moderate-intensity zone as much as possible. (Locked) More »

New motivation to move more

 In people who sit more than 12 or 13 hours per day, sitting for periods of 30 minutes or longer is associated with a greater risk for early death compared with sitting for less than 30 minutes at a time. More »

Exercising arthritis pain away

Studies indicate that physical therapy is often just as effective as surgery in reducing pain and increasing function for people with arthritis in their knees or backs. It’s wise to seek out physical therapy whenever joint pain interferes with your normal activities for more than a few days. (Locked) More »

Take a stand against sitting

More than half of the average person’s waking hours are spent sitting. All that sitting can increase risk for heart disease and early death. Yet a person can offset sitting’s health risks by doing just two minutes of light-intensity activity like walking for each hour of sitting, and at least an hour of moderate-intensity exercise after sitting for more than eight hours a day. (Locked) More »

Tennis, anyone?

People who play tennis a few times a week may lower their chances of dying of heart disease or a stroke compared with inactive people. Tennis provides an upper- and lower-body workout, as well as intermittent, high-intensity activity, both of which are thought to be good for the heart. Tennis playing also has been linked to other factors associated with heart health, including a lower body-fat percentage and more favorable cholesterol levels. Finally, the game encourages mindfulness and strengthens social ties, which may lower stress levels. (Locked) More »

Put some pep in your step!

Interval walking is a form of interval training, which describes any form of exercise in which a person purposely speeds up and slows down at regular intervals throughout the session. Interval walking may improve endurance, reduce blood pressure, and help with weight loss. To introduce intervals into a well-established routine, include one or two segments of fast-paced walking in a 30-minute walk. Gradually add more intervals into the routine, with an ultimate goal of walking 50% of the time at the higher intensity. There’s flexibility in how that can be done—one minute on, one minute off, or two minutes on, two minutes off. More »

Take a swing at racket sports

Racket sports like tennis, squash, badminton, racquetball, Ping-Pong, and other variations are the ideal exercise for many older men. Besides offering a good cardiovascular workout, they can help with both upper- and lower-body strength at once, can be modified to fit any age or fitness level, and do not involve a lot of equipment. (Locked) More »