Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Easy ways to fight pandemic-era inactivity

Two-, five-, or 10-minute breaks are all it takes to interrupt the unhealthy physiological processes percolating during long periods of sitting. Ideas for two-minute breaks include hula-hooping or stair climbing. Five-minute breaks allow enough time to walk around the yard or complete household chores. The best way to maximize a 10-minute break is to take a brisk walk outside or follow a 10-minute video designed specifically for a mini workout, such tai chi, yoga, or dance. (Locked) More »

Stuck at home?

It may be difficult to leave the house to exercise this winter, but there are numerous exercises that can be done at home, including walking, stationary biking, strength training, yoga, tai chi, and balance training. Most of these options don’t require expensive equipment or a live instructor. Online classes are also a great option if a person can’t get to the gym. More »

Why you should move — even just a little — throughout the day

People who sit for long, uninterrupted periods of time may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, even if they get the recommended 30 minutes of daily exercise. Sedentary behavior appears to make people more prone to developing insulin resistance and inflammation, which are key players in the buildup of fatty plaque inside arteries. Experts say people should add short bursts of movement to their daily routine to break up long periods of sitting. (Locked) More »

Calcium scan concerns

Coronary artery calcium scans tend to be quite accurate. Unlike some other imaging tests, the results are unlikely to be either falsely negative or falsely positive because the results are literally black and white (the calcium shows up as white on the scan). (Locked) More »

Can home remedies help my sciatica?

There are numerous home remedies that can help ease pain associated with sciatica, including using hot or cold compresses, taking over-the-counter pain relievers, and moving and stretching. (Locked) More »

More daily movement may lower cancer deaths

People who move more during the day may be at a much lower risk of dying from cancer compared with more sedentary individuals. Experts recommend getting at least 30 minutes of daily activity to counter the effects from sitting. More »

Protect your bones with tai chi

Tai chi is a gentle exercise that helps prevent falls and may reduce the chance of a bone fracture. Those who perform tai chi see a 20% to 40% reduction in fall risk. In addition, there is some evidence that tai chi may help reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women, because it is a weight-bearing exercise that can stimulate bone growth. The practice helps reverse age-related changes such as muscle weakness and slow reaction time. More »

Reinvent your walking regimen

A brisk walk is excellent exercise, but some people find it boring. Incorporating other activities into the walk can make it more interesting. For example, a person can boost cardio fitness during a walk by using Nordic walking poles or by periodically picking up the pace for brief spurts of 15, 30, or 60 seconds. A brisk walk can also be used as a time to socialize with family or friends, or to have a heart-to-heart chat. A brisk walk is also a good time to practice mindfulness. More »

Step up your walking fitness

People who walk for their primary form of exercise, or even just for recreation, need to make sure they stay in good walking shape to avoid injuries and improve their endurance. Adopting a cross-training routine that focuses on strengthening the legs, hips, and core can keep walkers in tip-top shape. (Locked) More »