Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

The drug-free approach to pain management

One of the main reasons for the growing addiction to pain medicine is the ease at which it is often prescribed. Yet, depending on a person’s type and severity of pain, there may be nondrug options available that can help control, manage, and perhaps treat the underlying cause of painful flare-ups. These include physical therapy, yoga, mind-body therapies, and complementary treatments, among others. More »

Babying your back may delay healing

Back pain often comes on without warning and will usually get better on its own, even when imaging shows changes such as arthritis and disc degeneration. The best way to treat back pain is to avoid prolonged rest and stay active instead. Aggressive interventions may actually make the condition worse. More »

Moving away from knee osteoarthritis

An estimated 10% of men ages 60 and older having symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or aspirin, and steroid injections can temporarily soothe arthritis pain and inflammation. But an easier and safer way to manage symptoms is to be more active as bones and cartilage need the stimulation of regular movement to stay healthy and pain free. More »

Take that, muscle cramps!

When muscle cramps strike suddenly, gently stretching the muscle can relieve pain. A shortcut for nighttime leg cramp stretches is sitting up in bed, looping the blanket around the foot, and gently pulling the toes up while keeping the knee straight. A “child’s pose” yoga posture can help ease back cramps. A “forward bend” yoga pose may relieve hamstring cramps. After stretching the muscle, it helps to put a heating pad on the area to promote blood flow, and then to gently massage the muscle. (Locked) More »

Walk this way

A walking cadence of about 100 steps per minute may be a good way to gauge moderate-intensity exercise, but not necessarily for everyone. That pace might feel a little slow for fit people who exercise regularly. But it may be too fast for people who are not exercising regularly or who have illnesses or injuries. A different measure, the “rate of perceived exertion” scale, may be a better guide for determining whether someone is exercising intensely enough. More »

Americans aren’t meeting exercise goals

A report published online June 28, 2018, by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics suggested that most Americans are not meeting the guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. More »

How to get a move on

Women who have been sedentary for years can benefit from an exercise program. But getting started may be a challenge. Often it is a fear of not fitting in or the idea that they are not athletic that prevents them from taking the first step. But charting out a reasonable plan ahead of time can help overcome those barriers. (Locked) More »

Rethinking the 30-minute workout

Federal guidelines advocate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week for optimal health, which breaks down to 30 minutes, five days a week. People who have trouble finding the time for exercise can break down their 30-minute workouts into smaller segments throughout the day. Also, doing less than the required 150 weekly minutes can still offer significant health benefits compared with not doing any exercise. (Locked) More »