Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

"Awe" walks inspire more joy, less distress

A study published online Sept. 21, 2020, by Emotion found that looking for things that spark a sense of wonder during a 15-minute walk led to increased feelings of awe, joy, compassion, and gratitude. More »

Don’t let muscle mass go to waste

Age-related muscle loss is a natural part of getting older. But muscle loss can occur faster after an injury, illness, or any prolonged period of inactivity, leading to muscle atrophy. The consequences can mean overall weakness, poor balance, and even frailty. The good news is that it’s possible to rebuild lost muscle through a comprehensive program that includes physical therapy, strength training, cardio, flexibility, and a nutrition plan that includes more protein and calories. More »

Obesity is still on the rise among American adults

American adults are gaining weight, according to data from the CDC. The prevalence of obesity is still on the rise, and in 12 U.S. states, 35% of the population is now obese, compared with just six states in 2017 and nine states in 2018. More »

Easy ways to fight pandemic-era inactivity

Two-, five-, or 10-minute breaks are all it takes to interrupt the unhealthy physiological processes percolating during long periods of sitting. Ideas for two-minute breaks include hula-hooping or stair climbing. Five-minute breaks allow enough time to walk around the yard or complete household chores. The best way to maximize a 10-minute break is to take a brisk walk outside or follow a 10-minute video designed specifically for a mini workout, such tai chi, yoga, or dance. (Locked) More »

Stuck at home?

It may be difficult to leave the house to exercise this winter, but there are numerous exercises that can be done at home, including walking, stationary biking, strength training, yoga, tai chi, and balance training. Most of these options don’t require expensive equipment or a live instructor. Online classes are also a great option if a person can’t get to the gym. More »

Why you should move — even just a little — throughout the day

People who sit for long, uninterrupted periods of time may increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, even if they get the recommended 30 minutes of daily exercise. Sedentary behavior appears to make people more prone to developing insulin resistance and inflammation, which are key players in the buildup of fatty plaque inside arteries. Experts say people should add short bursts of movement to their daily routine to break up long periods of sitting. More »

Can home remedies help my sciatica?

There are numerous home remedies that can help ease pain associated with sciatica, including using hot or cold compresses, taking over-the-counter pain relievers, and moving and stretching. (Locked) More »

More daily movement may lower cancer deaths

People who move more during the day may be at a much lower risk of dying from cancer compared with more sedentary individuals. Experts recommend getting at least 30 minutes of daily activity to counter the effects from sitting. More »

Reinvent your walking regimen

A brisk walk is excellent exercise, but some people find it boring. Incorporating other activities into the walk can make it more interesting. For example, a person can boost cardio fitness during a walk by using Nordic walking poles or by periodically picking up the pace for brief spurts of 15, 30, or 60 seconds. A brisk walk can also be used as a time to socialize with family or friends, or to have a heart-to-heart chat. A brisk walk is also a good time to practice mindfulness. More »