Oral Health

Oral Health Articles

Gum disease and the connection to heart disease

For me, it's been one of the more surprising observations in recent years:  study after study has shown that people who have poor oral health (such as gum disease or tooth loss) have higher rates of cardiovascular problems such as heart attack or stroke than people with good oral health. A number of theories have been proposed, including: More »

Gum disease and heart disease: The common thread

People with gum disease (also known as periodontal disease) have two to three times the risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or other serious cardiovascular event. Both conditions involve chronic inflammation, which contributes to many health problems. The connection suggests another reason why people should be vigilant about preventing gum disease, which is characterized by swollen, red, or tender gums that bleed easily. Daily toothbrushing and flossing can prevent and even reverse early signs of gum disease, known as gingivitis. (Locked) More »

Study links gum disease to cancer in older women

A new study shows that women with periodontal disease may be at higher risk of cancer, but some experts say they’re skeptical because of study limitations. Even so, it’s important to protect gum health, because periodontal disease has been linked to other health conditions. (Locked) More »

Tuning up your teeth

Most dental work—like crowns, bridges, implants, and dentures—can last seven to 10 years on average, if not longer, if people maintain excellent oral hygiene and see their dentist every six months. Various signs indicate when replacements or upgrades are needed. (Locked) More »

How should I treat canker sores?

Short summary: Canker sores are small ulcers that appear on the inside of the cheeks and lips. Treatment involves easing the pain with over-the-counter or prescription anesthetics in the form of liquids, gels, and pastes, or an occlusive that offers a protective coating when eating salty, spicy, or acidic foods. (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Do I really need to floss every day?

The long-term benefits of flossing are still unknown. While new federal guidelines have dropped the recommendation for daily teeth flossing, the American Dental Association and most dentists still endorse the inexpensive and low-risk practice. More »

Two options for replacing lost teeth

The loss of teeth can lead to further dental complications. Bridges and implants can restore one’s bite. Which one is better depends on a number of factors, including number of teeth to be replaced, bone density, and overall health. More »

Is flossing really necessary?

The benefits of flossing haven’t been verified in randomized clinical trials. However, health authorities still recommend it for preventing disease-causing plaque. (Locked) More »