Oral Health

Oral Health Articles

Hidden dental dangers that may threaten your whole body

It’s hard for older adults to maintain good oral health. That may be because of declines in other abilities, age-related physical changes in the mouth, or chronic health conditions. The result is that older adults have an increased risk for tooth decay and gum disease. Steps that can help ward off those problems include brushing the teeth twice a day, flossing, using an interdental brush to remove debris in the teeth, using a prescription fluoride toothpaste or mouth rinse, and getting regular teeth cleanings. (Locked) More »

Brushing up on heart health

Taking good care of your teeth—including twice-daily brushing and yearly professional cleanings—seems to be linked to better heart health. More »

What could cause my sudden jaw pain?

Sudden jaw pain could be due to several conditions, including an irritated nerve, cluster headache, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, or a sign of cardiovascular disease. Since some of these involve immediate treatment, people should see their doctor to discuss their symptoms. (Locked) More »

Why do I have a salty taste in my mouth?

The most common causes of a salty taste in the mouth are side effects from medication and dehydration. Besides increasing daily water intake, people should review their medications with their doctor or pharmacist. (Locked) More »

Taking osteoporosis drugs shouldn't prevent you from getting oral surgery

Some women are being turned down for oral surgery or other dental procedures because they are taking osteoporosis drugs, which pose the risk of a rare condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw. But experts say the overall risk of developing this condition is low, and in most cases the fact that a woman is taking an osteoporosis drug shouldn’t stop her from receiving oral surgery. (Locked) More »

Finding hidden risk for heart disease

Most men are familiar with the common factors related to a higher heart disease risk, like cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, poor diet, and inadequate exercise. But there are other signs of risk men may not recognize, such as erectile dysfunction, abdominal fat, gum disease, and depression. The good news is that once these issues are recognized, they can be addressed and managed. (Locked) More »

Why has my sense of taste changed?

Losing some sense of taste often happens with older age, but you should consider what else might be causing it. Blocked nasal passages from allergies or a sinus infection and even one of your medications might be a factor. Addressing these issues with your doctor, including switching to a different drug, may help. (Locked) More »

Gum disease and the connection to heart disease

For me, it's been one of the more surprising observations in recent years:  study after study has shown that people who have poor oral health (such as gum disease or tooth loss) have higher rates of cardiovascular problems such as heart attack or stroke than people with good oral health. A number of theories have been proposed, including: More »