Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

5 foods to eat to help your heart

While the focus is often on avoiding unhealthy foods, adding in nutritious options can be a means of protecting and improving your heart health. Olive oil, mixed nuts, multicolored fruits and vegetables, fatty fish, and sources of soluble fiber are options to try. (Locked) More »

5 steps to long-lasting independent living

Older adults who want to continue to live independently need to focus on five areas of their health that can ensure their continued well-being and, ultimately, the preservation of their lifestyle. These five areas are staying mentally engaged, being active, sleeping well, eating right, and being current with health exams. (Locked) More »

Are artificial sweeteners healthy?

People may consume artificial sweeteners to help with weight loss or to avoid weight gain. Yet research has found that these sugar substitutes could have the opposite effect and promote weight gain. (Locked) More »

Healthy habits mean more disease-free years

An observational study published online Jan. 8, 2020, by The BMJ suggests that people who follow four or five healthy habits have an additional decade of disease-free living, compared with people who don’t follow any healthy lifestyle habits. More »

The dairy dilemma

Federal guidelines recommend two to three servings of low-fat or nonfat milk, cheese, or yogurt per day. However, some experts suggest limiting dairy to a single serving per day. Although fat from dairy products does not seem to increase heart disease risk, substituting fat from vegetables or vegetable oil for some dairy fat may lower a person’s risk. As more people move toward plant-based diets, popular alternatives for milk include almond and oat milk. (Locked) More »

The far-reaching effects of a little bit of weight loss

Losing 5% of one’s total body weight can result in clinically significant physiologic changes. For example, losing a little weight can reduce heartburn, knee pain, blood pressure, and diabetes risk. Losing 5% of one’s body weight may also lead to better sexual function, more restorative sleep, extra energy, and more self-esteem. To reach a 5% reduction in total body weight, it helps to exercise; eat a healthy diet rich in lean proteins, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds; and get enough sleep. (Locked) More »

Understanding acute and chronic inflammation

Inflammation plays an essential role in healing and injury repair and is an integral part of the way a person’s immune system keeps the body safe and healthy. Some inflammation is good. Too much is often harmful. The goal is to recognize when inflammation is merely doing its job, and when it can potentially cause problems. More »

Plant milk or cow’s milk: Which is better for you?

There is no health reason to switch from cow’s milk to a plant-based alternative. But people who do want to switch should ensure that the product they choose has a nutritional profile similar to cow’s milk. Some plant-based milks contain similar nutrients. Others fall short, particularly on protein. People should also try to avoid products with extra sugar and other additives. (Locked) More »