Healthy Aging

Healthy Aging Articles

Easing into exercise

Even if you’ve never done formal exercise, some regular moderate exercise — ideally for at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure and many other risk factors linked to heart disease. More »

Is there an age limit for a colonoscopy?

Whether men age 80 and older should have a colonoscopy depends upon many factors. Yet, the most important question is whether anything found on the colonoscopy will lead to treatment that improves a person’s quality of life. (Locked) More »

Pickleball pleasures and pitfalls

Pickleball has some drawbacks for older adults. One is that the game is not a total aerobic workout, although it can help work the muscles. Another drawback is the risk of injuries, such as strains or sprains of the ankle and knees. Pickleball also has fall and fracture risks for older players. Players can prepare for pickleball by wearing the right clothing during a game (shorts, court sneakers, and goggles); warming up before the game; and stretching the muscles after playing. (Locked) More »

Stand tall

Poor posture doesn’t just affect your appearance. It may lead to chronic pain and a curvature of the upper back known as kyphosis. Exercises that target your upper body, back, and core can help improve your posture. Other good strategies are to try yoga or tai chi or to work with a physical therapist to improve your strength and flexibility. More »

What has the most impact on longevity?

Studies suggest that genes and lifestyle affect longevity. Harvard researchers found that injecting certain genes into mice protected them from becoming obese and from developing type 2 diabetes, heart failure, and a particular kind of kidney failure. A recent study of worms found that when worms exercise regularly (but not too much) early in life, their metabolism improves, their muscles and guts function better throughout life, they live longer, and they are protected against the worm version of Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists must now learn if the findings translate to humans. (Locked) More »

Top tools to make bathing safer and simpler

Many tools in a wide range of prices can make bathing safer and simpler. Low-cost tools include long-handled scrubbers, a small stationary shower bench or chair, and nonslip floor treads or a rubber mat. More expensive tools include waterproof alert buttons, shower transfer benches, or walk-in shower kits. People who aren’t sure which tools they need can talk to an occupational therapist for an in-home assessment, which is sometimes covered by Medicare. (Locked) More »

Regain your confidence

It’s common for older adults to lose confidence as their body changes and they face life-altering events, like retirement, health issues, and loss of loved ones. Lack of confidence can make them more withdrawn, less active, and more fearful about everyday events like driving and handling technology. Some ways older adults can regain confidence is to work on personal appearance, learn a new skill, set a physical challenge, focus on being more social, and see a therapist or counselor to explore obstacles that affect their confidence. More »

Spring cleaning: Why more people are uncluttering the mind for better health

Meditating counters the body’s stress response by triggering the relaxation response—a physiological change that can help lower blood pressure, heart rate, breathing rate, oxygen consumption, adrenaline levels, and levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The health benefits of meditation are so potent that the practice is used as a treatment or complementary therapy for many conditions, such as high stress, high blood pressure, and chronic pain. There are many forms of meditation, such as mindfulness, transcendental meditation, guided imagery meditation, and tai chi and yoga. (Locked) More »

Retiring? What about your health?

It’s important to consider future health needs when it’s time to select a community for living out the golden years. Look for destinations with access to medical services, nonprofit health services like meal delivery, transportation services, affordable housing options, recreation opportunities, volunteering opportunities, and private-duty services. For example, walkable city centers are getting more consideration as retirement destinations, as are college towns that offer robust learning opportunities or entertainment. One shouldn’t overlook staying in an existing house and community if it meets future needs. More »