Healthy Aging

Healthy Aging Articles

Protect your bones with tai chi

Tai chi is a gentle exercise that helps prevent falls and may reduce the chance of a bone fracture. Those who perform tai chi see a 20% to 40% reduction in fall risk. In addition, there is some evidence that tai chi may help reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women, because it is a weight-bearing exercise that can stimulate bone growth. The practice helps reverse age-related changes such as muscle weakness and slow reaction time. (Locked) More »

Learn new things without leaving home

There are many ways to learn something new while at home. Tools include smartphone apps, books, online classes, project kits, podcasts, and even YouTube videos. Learning something new brings invaluable health benefits, such as sharper thinking and maybe even better brain health. The reason behind better thinking skills that result from learning could be new brain cell connections, which may lead to more paths for information to get where it needs to go. More »

Boost your ability to lift and carry heavy loads

It’s easier to lift and carry heavy items if one maintains the muscles that help do the job, such as the thigh, gluteal, abdominal, shoulder, and arm muscles. In addition, it helps to follow the rules of safe lifting and carrying. To lift: one should get close to the object and bend the knees slightly, wrap one’s arms around the object, push down with the legs, and stand up straight. To carry: one should hug the object close to the chest to boost stability. (Locked) More »

Step up your fitness and safety

Falls continue to be a significant cause of fatal injury among older adults. Lack of mobility and declining strength are the main contributors to falls, but an often unrecognized threat is simply the fear of falling. Practicing simple step-ups at home or in the gym can improve balance, lower-body strength, and confidence. (Locked) More »

Shore up your core

Your core muscles, which are those in your torso and pelvis, help you maintain your balance, and allow you to bend, twist and reach. Strengthening them is essential, especially after age 30 when you may start to lose muscle mass. The average 50-year-old who hasn’t done strength-building exercises may have already lost as much as 10% of her muscle mass. More »

The dating game

One downside to aging is the higher likelihood that people may be without a partner at some point. No matter what the reason for an individual’s singlehood, an excellent remedy is to begin dating again. Older people can find potential partners using Internet dating sites or by interacting with various group and community activities. More »

5 steps to long-lasting independent living

Older adults who want to continue to live independently need to focus on five areas of their health that can ensure their continued well-being and, ultimately, the preservation of their lifestyle. These five areas are staying mentally engaged, being active, sleeping well, eating right, and being current with health exams. (Locked) More »

Healthy habits mean more disease-free years

An observational study published online Jan. 8, 2020, by The BMJ suggests that people who follow four or five healthy habits have an additional decade of disease-free living, compared with people who don’t follow any healthy lifestyle habits. More »

How to be a mentor

Older adults who serve as a mentor to a child or young adult can not only help someone else, but also improve many aspects of their own health, such as self-esteem, cognitive function, and quality of life, and reduce their risk of loneliness and depression. (Locked) More »

Is intermittent fasting safe for older adults?

However, there isn’t solid evidence about the benefits or how fasting might affect older adults. Fasting risks could include too much weight loss or interference with medication regimens. Anyone thinking of trying intermittent fasting should talk to a doctor about it first, especially if the person already has health conditions such as diabetes or heart disease. More »