Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Can blood pressure medications interfere with my sex drive?

Certain blood pressure medications may cause sexual side effects like erectile dysfunction and a low sex drive. If the problem persists, a man should speak with his doctor about changing medications, lowering dosages, or exploring other possible health reasons. (Locked) More »

Get healthy for vacation

Taking regular vacations is good for one’s health, but to ensure this time is healthy and injury-free, people should adopt several strategies before and during their trip. This includes updating their medication, increasing their endurance, practicing good hydration, getting enough sleep, and protecting themselves from local insects and possible food contamination. (Locked) More »

Lessons from the blood pressure drug recall

In the summer of 2018, a number of blood pressure medications containing generic valsartan, losartan, and irbesartan were recalled after investigators discovered trace amounts of possible cancer-causing impurities in some of the products. The risk to consumers who took these drugs is very low. The FDA estimates that if 8,000 people took the highest valsartan dose, which is 320 milligrams, from recalled batches every day for four years, there would likely be one additional case of cancer over the lifetimes of those 8,000 people. People who take prescription medications should pay close attention to news alerts about drug recalls and check the FDA’s online list of recalled drugs for additional information. (Locked) More »

Sex hormones and your heart

As people age, the natural decline in sex hormone levels sometimes causes undesirable symptoms, including hot flashes and a flagging sex drive. Thanks to new evidence, information about the cardiovascular safety of estrogen and testosterone therapy has shifted over the years. For women with uncomfortable, frequent hot flashes that disrupt their sleep and daily function, hormone therapy is an option for those who are not at high cardiovascular risk. Men with troubling sexual dysfunction and fatigue may want to ask their doctor about checking their testosterone levels. In men ages 65 and older with low levels, testosterone therapy may improve libido and sexual satisfaction. (Locked) More »

Taking osteoporosis drugs shouldn't prevent you from getting oral surgery

Some women are being turned down for oral surgery or other dental procedures because they are taking osteoporosis drugs, which pose the risk of a rare condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw. But experts say the overall risk of developing this condition is low, and in most cases the fact that a woman is taking an osteoporosis drug shouldn’t stop her from receiving oral surgery. (Locked) More »

What to do if your medication is recalled

When a medication is recalled, caution is a must. It might be okay to stop taking a recalled medication if it’s an over-the-counter drug such as an allergy, headache, cold, or sleep remedy that’s meant only to relieve occasional symptoms. But one should speak with a pharmacist or doctor before stopping a prescription medication. The pharmacy may be able to get the same medication from a different drug company. If there are no other manufacturers available, either the patient or pharmacy can contact the doctor to switch to another medication. (Locked) More »

Feeling the burn? Antacids can provide some relief

Over-the-counter antacids may be effective at managing occasional bouts of heartburn. But persistent heartburn should be checked out by a doctor, who may want to prescribe medication or look for underlying medical causes. (Locked) More »

Nothing to sneeze at

Older adults can develop seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever, even if they never had them before. The best ways to help avoid allergy symptoms and manage their severity is to track the daily pollen count, use certain over-the-counter medication as needed, and potentially take allergy vaccines to build up resistance to specific allergens. More »