Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Certain pain relievers could harm your heart

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and naproxen, have been linked to higher cardiovascular risks. A new study seems to confirm the risks of these medications and shows that one particular NSAID, diclofenac (Voltaren), may bring higher risks than other medications in this class. For most people who take these medications for short periods of time, the risks aren’t a major concern, but people who take these drugs long-term and have other heart risk factors should discuss the pros and cons with their doctor. (Locked) More »

Drugstore sleep aids may bring more risks than benefits

Over-the-counter sleep aids are commonly used but may have side effects and risks, including daytime grogginess. They have also been associated with impaired thinking and memory loss. Improved sleep practices and even cognitive behavioral therapy are safer and more effective long-term strategies to address insomnia. More »

High calcium score: What’s next?

Otherwise healthy people who have a high score on a coronary artery calcium scan do not need an angiogram to confirm the findings. Instead, they should focus on lowering their cholesterol levels and other heart disease risk factors. (Locked) More »

Season of receiving: Use free services to stay independent

Nonprofit groups offer many types of health-related services. Examples at the local level include low-cost dental clinics, emotional support groups, meal or grocery delivery services, transportation, in-home health evaluations, exercise classes, health education classes, home evaluations for fall prevention, companion programs, and caregiver respite services. Examples at the state or national level include services to link people to free or low-cost prescription medications, hearing aids, and gently used home medical equipment. To find such services, one can ask for referrals at a doctor’s office, a local senior center, or a local Area Agency on Aging. More »

Why has my sense of taste changed?

Losing some sense of taste often happens with older age, but you should consider what else might be causing it. Blocked nasal passages from allergies or a sinus infection and even one of your medications might be a factor. Addressing these issues with your doctor, including switching to a different drug, may help. (Locked) More »

A deeper look at psoriasis

Psoriasis, a common skin condition, affects more men than women. While it doesn’t affect everyone the same way, the approach to treatment and prevention is often similar. There is no cure yet for psoriasis. The optimal goal of treatment is to reduce affected areas to 1% or less of the body surface area within three months, and to manage triggers to help prevent future outbreaks. (Locked) More »

Straight talk about your sex life

A recent survey found that even though many older adults enjoy an active sex life, few talk about their sexual health with their doctor or other health care provider. It’s important to have an open line of communication because in general, sexuality changes over time, and many older men encounter problems that can interfere with performance, such as erectile dysfunction or problems with arousal, energy, and stamina. (Locked) More »

The age of statins

The cholesterol-lowering statin drugs can help protect against heart attack or stroke, both for people who have already had one and those who are at high risk for one of these events. But a recent study of 50,000 people age 75 and older found that the drugs did not reduce overall survival or rates of heart attacks and strokes among healthy older adults with no history of heart disease. (Locked) More »