Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Can a slow heartbeat be dangerous?

A slow heartbeat may be nothing serious. But it may be a sign of disease, or it may be the side effect of a medication that can cause a slow heartbeat. A "slow" heartbeat is usually defined as below 60 beats per minute at rest (some experts say below 50). Some people have a slow heartbeat but no symptoms. Symptoms from a slow heartbeat include lightheadedness or feeling faint or actually fainting. They also include breathlessness. A person with symptoms that could be caused by a slow heartbeat should be medically evaluated. (Locked) More »

How does marijuana affect the heart?

An estimated two million people in the United States with cardiovascular disease currently use or have used marijuana. Converging (yet limited) evidence suggests the drug may be harmful to the heart. Marijuana can cause the heart to beat faster and blood pressure to rise. Heart attack risk also appears to rise in the hour after smoking marijuana, and the drug has also been linked to an increased likelihood of atrial fibrillation and stroke. (Locked) More »

Giving steroid injections a shot

People battling a flare-up of arthritis, bursitis, or tendinitis may find relief from a cortisone (or steroid) shot. This type of pain management is often used when over-the-counter and prescription medication or physical therapy no longer work. However, people need to be aware that a shot offers only short-term relief and not a cure. (Locked) More »

Is osteoarthritis reversible?

Osteoarthritis cannot be reversed, but symptoms can be reduced by exercising the affected area, and taking steps to control pain as advised by your doctor. More »

Should I take blood pressure medications at night?

A large randomized study published online Oct. 22, 2019, by the European Heart Journal found that taking blood pressure medications at night rather than the morning appears to significantly lower blood pressure and lower the risk for heart attack, stroke, surgery or stents to open blocked arteries in the heart, and death from heart disease or stroke. The study also found that taking blood pressure medications at night instead of the morning seemed to have no adverse effects, such as a higher rate of getting dizzy and falling when getting up at night to go to the bathroom. (Locked) More »

What’s the best time of day to take your medication?

When it comes to the best time of day to take medication, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach. It depends on the particular medication, a person’s health conditions, and other drugs being taken. For example, some pills are best taken in the morning, before breakfast, to promote better absorption. Others may need to be taken at bedtime because they may cause drowsiness. One should always ask about the best time of day to take a medication when it’s first prescribed. (Locked) More »

Tips to keep lost weight off in the New Year

Maintaining weight loss can be more challenging than losing it in the first place. This is the case because your body drives you to store more fat. Unless you address that underlying regulatory problem, you will likely regain the weight. Some common causes of the underlying metabolic problems are stress, poor sleep, or medication. (Locked) More »