Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

More antidotes for newer blood thinners

Blood thinners (also called anticoagulants) are prescribed to people at risk for developing dangerous blood clots. Sometimes the medications cause internal bleeding. However, there are now antidotes for all of the newer blood thinners. The antidotes reverse the blood-thinning effect of the drugs within minutes. These antidotes have no other side effects. Doctors suggest that having antidotes gives people who take blood thinners some reassurance. New blood thinners are now considered safer than the older blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin). (Locked) More »

Your health through the decades

By age 60, all men tend to get thrown together into the so-called 60-and-older group, even though there are often significant differences between a man who is 65 and one who is 85. Certain lifestyle habits need to be maintained, no matter what a man’s age, such as adopting a heart-healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, and continuing a regular exercise routine to build strength, flexibility, and cardio fitness. Yet most men also need to place extra attention on certain aspects of their health depending on whether they are in their 60s, 70s, or 80s. (Locked) More »

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

Anticholinergic drugs linked with dementia

Anticholinergic medications used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson’s disease, and depression are associated with an increased risk of dementia, suggests a new study. People who got dementia had taken the medications for between four and 20 years, and the longer they took the drugs, the greater the risk. More »

Are drugstore sleep aids safe?

An occasional night of sleeplessness may warrant the use of an over-the-counter sleep medication or a sleep-promoting dietary supplement. Sleep medications that are available over the counter use antihistamines as their main active ingredient. They are generally safe, but there aren’t a lot of data about their long-term use. Dietary supplements that may promote sleep include chamomile, melatonin, and valerian root. There aren’t a lot of data about the safety and effectiveness of chamomile and valerian root. Melatonin can be taken safely for the long term. It is meant to shift the timing of one’s sleep cycle. (Locked) More »

Stay safe from superbugs

Superbugs are bacteria that have developed immunity to some or all antibiotics used to treat infections. Most often people will be infected with superbugs only in a hospital setting. But the risk of infection with a superbug can be reduced by washing hands regularly, reducing antibiotic use when possible, and asking questions about infection-control procedures in a hospital setting. (Locked) More »