Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Choosing an over-the-counter allergy medication

There are two primary ways over-the-counter (OTC) medications help manage allergies. One is by blocking the effects of histamine with a medication called an antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or loratidine (Claritin). Another way is by suppressing the immune system response before it releases histamine. This is done with corticosteroid nasal sprays. OTC versions include budesonide (Rhinocort), fluticasone propionate (Flonase), and triamcinolone (Nasacort). A combination of an antihistamine and a corticosteroid nasal spray is often the most effective treatment. (Locked) More »

Don't ignore vaginal dryness and pain

Vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain during intercourse affect 50% of women after menopause and are caused by declining estrogen levels in the body. A study showed that vaginal estrogen and moisturizers are equally effective in reducing symptoms in some women. But existing treatments often fall short of providing full relief. (Locked) More »

Medications we're watching

Medications approved in 2018 include sublingual sufentanil (Dsuvia), an oral form of a powerful opioid painkiller; cannabidiol (Epidiolex), the first prescription drug made from marijuana; and baloxavir marboxil (Xofluza), an antiviral medication. More »

The growing problem of an enlarged prostate gland

By age 60, about half of all men will have an enlarged prostate. While the condition does not increase the risk of getting prostate cancer or having sexual problems, it can affect quality of life, specifically with annoying and embarrassing urination problems. Certain medications can help relieve symptoms, which means less urinary urgency and fewer nighttime awakenings to use the bathroom. More »

What is labile hypertension?

Labile hypertension is a condition marked by blood pressure readings that fluctuate far more than normal. It has many possible causes, including too much caffeine, anxiety, and stress, or the use of pain relievers known as NSAIDs. (Locked) More »

Prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids to prevent heart disease?

A prescription drug called icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) that contains large doses of EPA (an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil) lowers high blood levels of triglycerides. For some people, it also may reduce heart attacks, strokes, and related events. Triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, have been getting more attention of late for their role in heart disease. But the heart-protecting benefits of icosapent ethyl may also arise from calming inflammation, making blood less likely to clot, and preventing dangerous heart rhythms. (Locked) More »

Soothing solutions for irritable bowel syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is most common in people in their 30s and 40s; however, it can occur at any age. The exact cause of IBS has yet to be discovered and it is impossible to prevent. The goal is to focus on managing the condition, which can be done by identifying specific triggers for IBS symptoms and then adopting strategies to make your symptoms less severe and less frequent. The most common treatment approaches are diet, stress management, and medication. (Locked) More »

Strategies to manage surgical pain

Taking opioid medications after surgery can lead to problems, including addiction, and should be avoided when possible. Taking nonprescription pain relievers; recognizing a certain amount of discomfort as normal; and adopting non-medication pain relief methods, such as icing after surgery, can reduce the need for opioid pain medications. (Locked) More »