Bone & Muscle Health

Bone & Muscle Health Articles

Boning up on osteoporosis

About one in four men older than 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis during their lifetime. Proper bone health not only can help protect men from osteoporosis, but can also reduce their risk of serious breaks or fractures from falls or other injuries. Adopting certain exercises and getting adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D are the best strategies for keeping bones strong and safe. (Locked) More »

Collarbone (Clavicle) Fracture

When a bone breaks or cracks, the injury is called a fracture. In the collarbone (clavicle), fractures can happen in three separate areas: The collarbone is one of the most common fractures. In most collarbone fractures, the ends of the fractured bone do not move apart widely, and the area of tissue damage involves only the collarbone. In rare cases, a sharp portion of the fractured bone either will pierce the surface skin (an open fracture), or cut into one of the large nerves or blood vessels that travel through the shoulder. In severe impact injuries, it is also possible for a portion of the fractured collarbone to penetrate the upper part the lung, causing serious breathing problems. (Locked) More »

Pickleball pleasures and pitfalls

Pickleball has some drawbacks for older adults. One is that the game is not a total aerobic workout, although it can help work the muscles. Another drawback is the risk of injuries, such as strains or sprains of the ankle and knees. Pickleball also has fall and fracture risks for older players. Players can prepare for pickleball by wearing the right clothing during a game (shorts, court sneakers, and goggles); warming up before the game; and stretching the muscles after playing. (Locked) More »

Can I do anything to prevent osteoporosis?

Many risk factors for osteoporosis, such as sex, age, and genes, are not modifiable. But women at risk can make changes to improve bone health, such as not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption, exercising more, and adopting a healthy diet rich in calcium and getting enough vitamin D. More »

Bone Scan

A bone scan uses radiation to make images showing areas of bone where cells are unusually active. Unusually active cells can indicate cancer, bone trauma, infection or other disorders. First, a radioactive chemical called an isotope is injected into a vein. The isotope enters the bloodstream and travels to the bones, where it emits gamma rays, which are similar to X-rays. A gamma camera can detect gamma rays. A computer analyzes the rays and forms an image (or scan) of the bones. Areas with potential problems send out more intense rays and appear as bright spots on the scan. (Locked) More »

Is it too late to save your posture?

It’s usually not too late to improve posture, even with rounded shoulders or healed compression fractures. The key is strengthening and stretching the upper back, chest, and core muscles. Shoulder strengtheners include scapula squeezes and rows. Core strengtheners include modified planks or simply tightening the abdominal muscles, pulling the navel in toward the spine. It’s also important to cut down on activities that have led to poor posture, such as sitting slouched for long periods in front of a computer or TV. (Locked) More »

Too much vitamin D may harm bones, not help

A new study found that high doses of vitamin D don’t benefit bone health. Bone density didn’t improve any more in people who took 4,000 IU or 10,000 IU of vitamin D daily for three years when compared to people who took a low dose of 400 IU. In fact, study authors said they found that very high amounts may have actually been detrimental to bone health. More »

Difficult relationships linked to bone loss

Stressful interpersonal relationships may be linked to bone loss in women, according to a new study. Women who reported higher levels of stress saw bigger reductions in bone density than women who reported less stress. More »

A broken back without the fall

Compression fractures of the spine might not have symptoms. However, they could signal trouble on the way. When one vertebra fractures, there’s a high risk that another will. Each fracture brings a slight loss of height and a reduced ability to bend. A number of fractures contribute to a rounding of the back known as dowager’s hump (dorsal kyphosis). The condition significantly increases the risk for disability, as well as difficulty digesting food or breathing. When a compression fracture is discovered, doctors recommend starting treatment for osteoporosis. (Locked) More »