Aging

Children born today in the United States can expect to live nearly 78 years. That life expectancy is a great leap forward from 1900, when the average newborn couldn’t expect to reach age 50. Similar increases have been seen in in developed nations all around the world. In the 20th century, life expectancy increased more than it had in any century since the beginning of human civilization.

Life expectancy at various ages in teh United States

And the longer you live, the longer you can expect to live. Average life expectancy for a newborn American is 78 years, while it is 84 years for a 65-year-old and 87 years for a 75-year old.

But extending the lifespan has also increased the burden of diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, macular degeneration, and other conditions that tend to affect older individuals. Most of these diseases, though, aren't inevitable consequences of aging. Instead, many are preventable.

Solid research from long-term studies such as the Framingham Heart Study, the Nurses' Health Study, and others have shown that the combination of not smoking, eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and keeping blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar in check can prevent three-quarters or more of these chronic conditions.

Aging Articles

Are you at risk for a secondary cataract?

Sometimes a side effect of cataract surgery triggers the return of cataract symptoms. The side effect is called posterior capsule opacification, also known as a secondary cataract. It occurs when cells from the old cataract remain in the eye and continue to grow, blocking the light to the retina. An eye doctor can treat this problem with YAG laser capsulotomy, a simple, quick, and painless laser procedure that clears a pathway for light to travel to the retina. More »

Is it time to rethink how much you drink?

Contrary to popular belief, moderate alcohol use might not benefit cardiovascular health, especially for people who are 65 and older. People also often miscalculate what counts as a single drink and don’t recognize that many mixed drinks contain more than one serving of alcohol. In addition, they may not appreciate that alcohol affects people differently with increasing age. Tips for cutting back on alcohol include limiting drinking to restaurants and social occasions and diluting wine or cocktails with sparkling water and ice. More »

Sexual and gender minorities face unique health risks

Sexual and gender minorities may have higher risks of certain health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and mental illnesses, including anxiety and depression. A new study also found that they may be at higher risk for dementia.  There are strategies that can mitigate this risk, including adopting health habits proven to promote heart health, such as a healthy diet, regular screening exams and frequent exercise. Experts also recommend addressing mental health problems quickly and finding a LGBT-friendly provider. (Locked) More »

Straight talk about your new sex life

Men and women go through all kinds of physical and emotional changes as they age that can affect their sex life as well as their relationship. These changes are often embarrassing or difficult to talk about, but communicating about them to each other can help couples find solutions and common ground. (Locked) More »

The thinking on brain games

Engaging in brain games, such as crosswords, chess, and bridge, as well as creative outlets like painting, playing an instrument, or learning a language, have not been proven to protect against memory loss. Yet, these pursuits can help with everyday thinking skills and, when teamed with regular exercise, can increase a person’s cognitive reserve. (Locked) More »

5 tools to help you stand up on your own

Some tools can help people stand up from a seated position. For example, a “couch cane” provides additional support to get up off of a couch. A car grab bar slips into a door latch and acts as an extra support to lean on when exiting or entering a car. Rotating seat cushions help a person swing the legs into standing position. And furniture risers raise the height of a seat, which may also assist someone when standing. The ultimate assistance in getting up from a chair is an automatic electric recliner. More »

5 medications that can cause problems in older age

Medications that caused few if any side effects in youth can cause discomfort or risky side effects later in life. Common offenders include anti-anxiety drugs, antihistamines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sleeping pills, and tricyclic antidepressants. While a person may not have to avoid using these medications in older age, it may be necessary to use them carefully and judiciously: minimizing doses, using them only when necessary, and turning to other methods to manage symptoms when they arise. (Locked) More »

What to do when reading gets harder

Many aspects of health in older age can affect the ability to read, such as poor vision, pain, hand tremors, and difficulty concentrating. Treating an underlying condition can help (such as getting a new pair of reading glasses). And sometimes all it takes to improve reading is using a few strategies. If it’s painful to hold a book, one can try propping it up on a pillow or book holder. For vision challenges, electronic reading devices and large-print books can help greatly. When attention is the challenge, reading in a quiet space or reading out loud can help. (Locked) More »

A look at better vision

For many older adults with increasing poor vision who may have cataracts, or get them in the future, lens replacement surgery (LRS) may be a good option, as it addresses both problems. LRS replaces the natural lens in an eye with a synthetic lens called an intraocular lens, which can correct vision problems so a person no longer needs glasses and will not develop cataracts in the future. More »