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Abdominal fat and what to do about it

Updated: December 01, 2006

Even if you're not overweight, fat around the middle can be a health risk.

Though the term might sound dated, "middle-age spread" is a greater concern than ever. As women go through their middle years, their proportion of fat to body weight tends to increase — more than it does in men. Especially at menopause, extra pounds tend to park themselves around the midsection, as the ratio of fat to lean tissue shifts and fat storage begins favoring the upper body over the hips and thighs. Even women who don't actually gain weight may still gain inches at the waist.

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