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Children's Health

The latest on a simple way to help prevent food allergies in kids

food_allergy
March 08, 2016

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Comments

Maria Jasmine Freeman
March 13, 2016

Absolutely true. Early exposure to allergens( antigens) allow for tolerance at the level of the immune system, a principle of immune therapy. This is where breastfeeding is crucial aside from its array of benefits, allowing for minor gradual exposure thus establishing tolerance. Of course if allergy to some component is already proven, avoidance is the rule.
Funny, allergy and asthma are on the rise, paradoxically in parallel with earlier advice of avoidance of allergen exposure, which supports the above mentioned new findings. In a digression, over sanitation and vaccination are a major association with uprise of allergy and asthma. In the old days of pediatric practice we allowed babies to receive rice derivatives at an early age- at one month; when the trend was restricted, allergy is only unleashed.
Dr Hana Fayyad( Maria Jasmine Freeman)

Kayden
April 13, 2016

The accident of finding this post has breintghed my day

Daniel Witkowski
March 11, 2016

A step in the right direction!
Let’s not get stuck on the dot and too scientific, though.
Introducing a variety of foods at an early age, as we have for centuries will enable the next generation the ability to enjoy the flavors and foods of the world without fear.

kimberly
March 11, 2016

Is there enough exposure provided through Mom’s breast milk? If Mom eats peanuts, fish and eggs, then the baby should benefit from both early exclusive breast feeding and early introduction to these foods. (I’m surprised this wasn’t known much sooner. It seems as though we’ve known forever that babies who grow up with pets in the home have fewer pet allergies; babies on farms are allergic to almost nothing!)

Chris
March 09, 2016

Be really careful with this. There is nothing conclusive about this study. It could lead to more dangerous reactions in young children that can’t communicate pain or discomfort. More questionable advice from the supposed experts. Can the medical community just admit that they don’t know anything about allergies?

Janet Aspler
March 09, 2016

Eh Science technique even changes but old sayings like if it not broken don’t need fixing Ha Ha … Breast is Best for Baby and Dad !!! Ha Ha Ha !!! Happy St Patricks Day hope you have a malted one and some nice Brussesl Sprouts at Easter and Chocolate!!! Cheers God Bless!

April
March 09, 2016

I feel bad about the bad advice all of us gave for years — if only we had known! But now we do know. It’s time to spread the word — and the peanut butter.

But we (human race) do know. I vividly remember that when my mother (who came from Asia) after I had my daughter, she was deeply puzzled by the doctor’s advise of leaving out peanuts, fish and eggs in her diet with no clear reason. She said ‘but nobody in our families is allergic to them? So why not let her have them – these are much better food than those bottled mush you buy from the store! We feed them to babies for generations in Asia!’. She got to the kitchen and cooked what she thought baby food should be. It was all fine.

So I feel that problem is not what we do not know, but that we think that what we thought we know is better than the world’s common sense.

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