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Regular meditation more beneficial than vacation

vacation-vs-meditation
October 27, 2016

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Comments

maisie
December 14, 2016

Agree with you…… i am part of yoga retreats centre. i have seen people come for yoga retreats mostly during vacations only…they learn to meditate and feel stress free. But again when vacations are over, they donot regularly do the meditation and yoga. Waiting for next vacations to come and then only in yoga retreats centre they will start doing yoga & meditation. I always suggest to everybody to do meditation on regular basis for long term benefits.

Buchard Albert
November 4, 2016

At least two bias:
– They all went on vacation
– They did exercice / yoga

A better design would be meditation everyday while working (no vacation) vs going on vacation.

S b
October 30, 2016

The mediators presumably continued meditating, (+ yoga, good eating, relationships),..howevever, the vacationers did not continue vacationing for the next 10 months!!!

Winnie Low
November 21, 2016

On top of that, meditation is totally free of charge and no traveling “risks”.
Bravo !!

Henry Huta
October 29, 2016

As an owner of The Ancient Wisdom of Yoga, a yoga studio where we also teach meditation, provide massage therapy, craniosacral therapy, and acupuncture, and as a PhD candidate at Grand Canyon University writing my dissertation, it would be helpful to me and many others for the inclusion of the APA citations for the studies referenced in your articles. Perhaps you could consider this as a policy going forward. I appreciate the opportunity of making a comment and for your consideration of my suggestion. I also understand if this may not be possible, Namaste, Henry.

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
October 30, 2016

Absolutely- there is supposed to be a link to this article in the text above, but I do not see it. I’ll send a note to the editor, meantime, here is the citation off PubMed:
Meditation and vacation effects have an impact on disease-associated molecular phenotypes. Epel ES, Puterman E, Lin J, Blackburn EH, Lum PY, Beckmann ND, Zhu J, Lee E, Gilbert A, Rissman RA, Tanzi RE, Schadt EE.
Transl Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 30;6(8):e880. doi: 10.1038/tp.2016.164

Carl Erikson
October 29, 2016

I have been involved in mind/body research and practice since 1977, including at Johns Hopkins. I have been recommending meditation and mindfulness to my psychotherapy practice clients for almost 4 decades. Often it is helpful to have some instruction for meditation. I usually suggest they work with the meditations by Jon Shore. I like to recommend them because they work. For whatever purpose one decides to explore or pursue meditation it will prove to be beneficial in many ways. One can argue all day about the effectiveness of meditation or mindfulness or one can try it and see for oneself. I usually recommend the second option.

ricke
October 28, 2016

Did the novice meditators continue the mindfulness practices after the study was over? If so, would the continuing mindfulness practices explain the lasting benefits?

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
October 30, 2016

It is not stated if this was asked, and it is a possibility.

Shailla
October 28, 2016

As a burnt out Physician and a yogi/Meditator, I would say do both! we all need to take a break and enjoy life, and the long term benefits of meditation are proven so it’s nit one or the other but both!

Monique Tello, MD, MPH
October 30, 2016

Yes, and I was thinking how great it would be to be a subject for a study like this… A week in a resort with yoga and meditation in addition to beaches etc. !

Barney Cazort
October 28, 2016

Citation: Translational Psychiatry (2016) 6, e880; doi:10.1038/tp.2016.164
Published online 30 August 2016

Meditation and vacation effects have an impact on disease-associated molecular phenotypes
OPEN

E S Epel1, E Puterman1, J Lin2, E H Blackburn2, P Y Lum3, N D Beckmann4, J Zhu4, E Lee4, A Gilbert1, R A Rissman5, R E Tanzi6 and E E Schadt4

A. Jeria
October 28, 2016

Do You have the reference of this study?
Greetings,
A. JERIA, MD, MSc

Barney Cazort
October 28, 2016

Meditation and vacation effects have an impact on disease-associated molecular phenotypes
OPEN

E S Epel1, E Puterman1, J Lin2, E H Blackburn2, P Y Lum3, N D Beckmann4, J Zhu4, E Lee4, A Gilbert1, R A Rissman5, R E Tanzi6 and E E Schadt4

Citation: Translational Psychiatry (2016) 6, e880; doi:10.1038/tp.2016.164
Published online 30 August 2016

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