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Give yourself an annual health self-assessment

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December 28, 2018
  • By: Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

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Comments

andy rose
February 03, 2019

As a newborn, your baby might not show too much interest in baby toys, no matter how bright or noisy they may be, but fast forward a couple of weeks and they definitely will. As your baby becomes more alert, they’ll start to engage in their environment and enjoy looking at bright or high-contrast colours, and listening to music.

azure
December 30, 2018

“or consider joining a club of some kind that has regular meetings and social events.” What data does the writer have that indicates that people over say, 55, make new friends if they go to a “club” meeting? And how many towns even have “clubs” any more? Other then country clubs. I’ve heard & read many comments from people (starting their 40’s) about how difficult it is to make new friends, and how it gets worse the older you are.

I’ve not seen any data that suggests the people I’ve heard or have read (posts on websites/blogs) are in a minority. So, where the data to support this suggestion?

Elly
January 19, 2019

Well, book clubs at the public library are open to all, for a start. Most High Schools are offering evening classes in cooking, gardening, language skills, etc. Check out Adult Ed classes, Friends of the Library, Bridge clubs, Senior Centers, church groups, hiking groups, local nature walking events, museums, and ask around.

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