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Conflict of interest in medicine

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October 01, 2018

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Comments

Bob
November 29, 2018

The question should be looked at this way (1) am I doing what is in the best interest of the person I am caring and (2) am I acquiring and applying skills to the best of my knowledge? If you answer these 2 questions honestly then the focus will be on patient outcome and not doctor’s income. These questions are more important than whether medical professionals are financially successful. If a doctor is observant and focused on patient wellness then he will not be concerned in disclosing how he is paid as it should be a consequence of successful health performance. But if they are getting rewarded for poor performance or poor patient outcomes then I have a problem as to how the 2 questions were answered. A good product or good health practitioner should be financially rewarded as a bad product or bad health practitioner should not. Receiving money or being financially successful does not tell us if the doctor is doing a good or a bad job or even if they are primarily focused on money. We need to look at patient outcomes and the doctor’s honesty in acquiring and applying his skills to the best of his knowledge. If the doctor is focused on financial reward primarily then he will not be able to answer the above questions appropriately.

Gurwinder singh
October 28, 2018

It amounts to poor leadership but fortunately I never encountered it at MSMC or at the other large academic center where I trained as a pathologist.
Such high liability risk and increased workloads does decrease the job satisfaction.
And on top of that the leadership decided to have staff members sign blank performance evaluations 2 years in advance.I’m sorry these days I fact check everything my doctor says, I am not as trusting than I was 20 years ago. American medicine is still a very fine system, but only for the people that can afford it. I don’t mean insurance, but pay for it out of pocket.
It is a sad state of affairs, but will not change til drug and food money is taking out of Washington DC. Don’t hold your breath on that anytime soon. So I would say “buyer beware”.

Diane Wagner
October 07, 2018

How about staff accepting 2 full time jobs and making others assume the increased liability risk when cases are not equitably distributed.
It amounts to poor leadership but fortunately I never encountered it at MSMC or at the other large academic center where I trained as a pathologist.
Such high liability risk and increased workloads does decrease the job satisfaction.
And on top of that the leadership decided to have staff members sign blank performance evaluations 2 years in advance.
The problem is leaving such a job when the patients need the medical care. But actually after 10 years there was no need to leave because I was fired for being the sole care giver of a 92 yo with dementia who was my Relative.
And if you think this abuse of staff was from a member of the opposite sex, it would be incorrect because it was a female who had been in a leadership position more than 20 years and still hold that position.
One thing I learned was to never sign a blank performance evaluation because that was very unethical!

lagrimasartificiales
October 05, 2018

Sadly, many doctors forget the Hippocratic oath putting economic and personal interests first.

J Rondinone
October 04, 2018

Good article Doctor, but you didn’t mention the Titantic iceberg of COI with statins. I wouldn’t except you would or could. The system is broken, where some are putting profits over patients health.
I’m sorry these days I fact check everything my doctor says, I am not as trusting than I was 20 years ago. American medicine is still a very fine system, but only for the people that can afford it. I don’t mean insurance, but pay for it out of pocket.
It is a sad state of affairs, but will not change til drug and food money is taking out of Washington DC. Don’t hold your breath on that anytime soon. So I would say “buyer beware”.

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