Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Join the healthy heart trend

A recent report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found the rates for heart disease among people ages 60 and older have fallen from 19.5% to 14.9% in the past decade. Three factors may explain the drop in heart disease rates, according to the survey researchers: better diet, increased physical activity, and more use of drug therapy like aspirin therapy and statins. More »

Why you should heed a ministroke

Transient ischemic attacks signal “silent” brain damage and impending stroke. Prompt treatment can minimize damage and prevent strokes. Controlling blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels, along with a healthy lifestyle, can prevent TIAs. (Locked) More »

You can protect yourself against superbugs

Infections of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing. People can reduce the risk by washing hands regularly, having recommended vaccines, taking antibiotics only as prescribed, and choosing organic meat, poultry, and dairy. (Locked) More »

Hormones and your heart

Age-related drops in sex hormone levels sometimes cause undesirable symptoms in both women and men. For women, hormone therapy (estrogen and progestins) can address those symptoms but should not be used for the purpose of reducing cardiovascular risk. A free mobile app called MenPro can help women understand their treatment options, based on their risk of heart disease. For older men, testosterone therapy may moderately improve sexual function but does not appear to improve mood or walking speed. But because there are no large, long-term studies of testosterone therapy in men, the heart risks are unknown. (Locked) More »