Men's Sexual Health

Sex is an important part of life. For many men, thinking about sex starts early, often before puberty, and lasts until their final days on earth.

On one level, sex is just another hormone-driven bodily function designed to perpetuate the species. On another, it's a pleasurable activity. It's also an activity that can help cement the bonds between two people.

Sexual health refers to a state of well-being that lets a man fully participate in and enjoy sexual activity. A range of physical, psychological, interpersonal, and social factors influence a man's sexual health.

Optimal male sexual health includes sexual desire (libido) and the ability to get and sustain an erection (erectile function). Although physiology can affect both the desire for sex and the ability to have sex, mental health and emotional factors also play important roles.

Male sexual health isn't merely the absence of disease. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get an erection or to maintain it long enough for satisfying sexual activity. Many things can cause ED, including stress, depression, relationship issues, abnormally low testosterone, damage from urological surgery, and even cholesterol-clogged arteries. In fact, it is often an early warning sign for heart disease. ED can be treated with pills, injections into the penis, or devices.  Men can also experience difficulties related to ejaculation, including premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, or the inability to experience orgasm upon ejaculation (anorgasmia).

 

Male sexual health also covers the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases and the assessment and treatment of male infertility.

Men's Sexual Health Articles

Can vitamin D levels signal aggressive prostate cancer?

Low levels of vitamin D may help predict aggressive prostate cancer, according to new research. While it only showed an association, the researchers believe low D levels could be used as a valuable biomarker, and help men and their doctors decide whether to consider active surveillance, in which the cancer is monitored for changes.   More »

A new look at testosterone therapy

Millions of older men have turned to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) to restore hormone levels in hopes of refueling depleted energy and reigniting their sex drive. While TRT remains controversial because of its potential health risks, it can be a viable option for a subgroup of men who meet specific criteria.  More »

Heart attack survivors can have sex without fear

Sex does not appear to trigger a heart attack or increase your risk for a second one after you have recovered. A new study found that more than 78% of those who had a heart attack said their last sexual activity occurred more than 24 hours beforehand. More »

Spice up your sex life with these 6 steps

Sexual activity has many benefits, such as improved mood and better physical health. But age-related physical changes can get in the way of sex. There are ways to boost one’s sex life. Pill-free ideas include smoking cessation, exercise, weight control, and alcohol moderation. When pill-free sex boosters aren’t enough to make a difference, it’s time consider medical intervention. It could be a matter of treating an underlying condition or switching to a medication that doesn’t hurt libido. Women may need relief from the effects of hormone changes. Men may need a prescription medication to boost erectile function.  (Locked) More »

Not satisfied with your sex life?

Erectile dysfunction usually stems from inadequate blood supply to the penis, but other causes can contribute. Diagnosing it and getting the right treatment requires a frank conversation with a doctor about your sexual function. Full sexual function requires sufficient arousal before intercourse. The most widely used drugs for erectile problems work in most men, but insurance coverage is limited, and they have potential side effects. (Locked) More »

Sex before and after a heart attack

Sex rarely triggers heart attacks, and sex after a heart attack is safe for most people. But some drugs to treat heart disease can cause erection problems, and others may have dangerous interactions with drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. More »

Vasectomy and prostate cancer

Vasectomy has been linked to higher risk of eventually being diagnosed with prostate cancer, but there is no convincing proof that one actually causes the other. (Locked) More »