Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

3 easy ways to boost your brain

Studies have indicted that caring for a dog, creating art, and spending time with a grandchild can boost different aspects of memory and reasoning. (Locked) More »

Boning up on osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is often considered a woman’s disease, but older men also need to be concerned about this bone-thinning condition. Osteoporosis can be detected early with a bone mineral density test, but there are steps men can take to help prevent and treat it. These include a combination of lifestyle changes, supplements, and medication, if necessary.  (Locked) More »

Fitness trackers: A path to a healthier heart?

New, scientifically validated digital fitness trackers may help people know if they’re exercising enough to lower their risk of heart disease. They rely on an algorithm known as Personalized Activity Intelligence that converts a person’s heart rate to a number of points, based on age, gender, and resting and maximum heart rate. For people who are sedentary or have chronic health conditions, the free iPrescribe Exercise app offers evidence-based advice that can help them exercise safely.  (Locked) More »

The family history of cancer

Family history can be one of the first lines of defense in preventing cancer. Knowing the detailed history of cancer on both sides of a man’s family can protect him, and even his children, by preventing cancers before they develop and helping to diagnose cancers early. (Locked) More »

What are the best ways to treat plantar warts?

Salicylic acid, a prescription-strength medicine, and cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen are common treatments for plantar warts. However, if these do not work, consult with a dermatologist or podiatrist about other options like other injected and topical drugs or laser therapy. (Locked) More »

Men: Stand up and protect yourself from the risk of osteoporosis

By Matthew SolanExecutive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch Don't think men need to worry about osteoporosis? Think again. Older men have a greater risk of osteoporosis-related fractures than of getting prostate cancer. In fact, about one in four men older than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis during their lifetime, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. More »

Looking for a few good men

Many research studies are looking for qualified men to participate. Not only can men help with the greater good of advancing medical research, participating in a study gives them an opportunity to prevent or treat common diseases and conditions with the latest medications, supplements, or procedures. (Locked) More »

The danger of “silent” heart attacks

Silent heart attacks, known as silent myocardial infarctions (SMIs), account for 45% of heart attacks and strike men more than women. They are “silent” because they can occur without the classic intense heart attack symptoms. Knowing the warning signs can ensure men seek medical attention and treatment and help avoid another, larger heart attack. (Locked) More »

When is it okay to split medication in half?

Splitting a pill into two equal halves is sometimes necessary when needing to adjust dosage, or as a means to save money buy purchasing higher-dose pills. However, splitting is not safe for all pills, so a person should always consult a pharmacist or doctor. (Locked) More »