Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Do not get sold on drug advertising

Prescription drug advertising is a multibillion-dollar industry and a main reason health care costs continue to rise. While the ad’s job is to sell the product, not to help the consumer, men can still use the information as a starting point to talk with their doctor about their health.  More »

Help with online health

Research has found that only one in five seniors uses some sort of digital health technology, especially medical and health care websites. Even though access to more medical information can help seniors become more active in maintaining their health and well-being, the barrier of poor website design keeps many from getting what they need. (Locked) More »

Is there hope for leg cramp sufferers?

Quinine, the best-established therapy for leg cramps, is associated with serious side effects. There is some evidence that vitamin B–complex capsules and diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor XR) may be effective, but insufficient evidence to recommend leg stretches. (Locked) More »

Kegels: Not for women only

Kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic floor muscles have long been seen as just for women, but they may be a way for many older men to address some common unpleasant issues, such as urinary leakage, bowel trouble, and even erection problems. A physical therapist can evaluate a man’s needs, design an individual program, and show him how to do the exercises correctly so he can then perform them at home.  More »

Don’t tolerate food intolerance

Food intolerances occur more often as men age since their digestion naturally slows and the body produces less of the enzymes needed to break down food. Using a food diary can help men identify problem foods and portion sizes that cause digestive problems so they can make the necessary dietary adjustments. (Locked) More »

New approach identifies returning prostate cancer

Researchers have mapped patterns of prostate cancer recurrence following surgery, which may help doctors find the best way to treat men whose cancer has returned. About 30% of men who have prostate cancer surgery will have a recurrence, according to the study in the Journal of Urology.  More »