Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Looking for a few good men

Many research studies are looking for qualified men to participate. Not only can men help with the greater good of advancing medical research, participating in a study gives them an opportunity to prevent or treat common diseases and conditions with the latest medications, supplements, or procedures. (Locked) More »

Now hear this: You may need hearing aids

Some estimates suggest that by age 65, about one-third of men need hearing aids; however, only half of this group wear them. Many men resist hearing aids because they symbolize declining health, but these tiny devices can improve their communication skills, their relationships, and even their brain function.  (Locked) More »

Overcoming anxiety

Millions of older adults suffer from anxiety. Idleness in retirement, financial worries, and health issues are the leading causes of anxiety among older men. However, the condition is highly treatable with therapy, medication, and simple lifestyle changes. More »

The danger of “silent” heart attacks

Silent heart attacks, known as silent myocardial infarctions (SMIs), account for 45% of heart attacks and strike men more than women. They are “silent” because they can occur without the classic intense heart attack symptoms. Knowing the warning signs can ensure men seek medical attention and treatment and help avoid another, larger heart attack. (Locked) More »

When is it okay to split medication in half?

Splitting a pill into two equal halves is sometimes necessary when needing to adjust dosage, or as a means to save money buy purchasing higher-dose pills. However, splitting is not safe for all pills, so a person should always consult a pharmacist or doctor. (Locked) More »

Men: talk with your doctor about resuming sex after a heart attack

A majority of men do not talk about resuming their sex life after a heart attack, which may lead to sexual problems like lack of interest and erectile difficulties. Researchers say that before being discharged from the hospital, men should expect to have a conversation with their physician about when it’s okay to resume all regular activities, including sex. If the topic does not come up, men should take the initiative. More »