Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

The heart attack gender gap

Men face a greater risk of heart disease than women and develop the disease at younger ages. Higher rates of unhealthy habits (such as smoking) may be partly to blame. But women have lower survival rates after a heart attack, perhaps because they are more likely to dismiss heart attack symptoms and delay seeking treatment. Women may also be less likely to receive beneficial medications and advice when they leave the hospital after a heart attack.  (Locked) More »

Men's hearts age differently from women's

Men's and women's hearts age differently, even though heart disease treatment for both sexes is the same, says a new study. Researchers suggest that future treatment for men may need to be different. More »

Retired men at work

Research has found that seniors who continue to work after age 65 are healthier than retirees. They are almost three times more likely to report being in good health compared with those who had retired, and are half as likely to be diagnosed with serious conditions like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Concern about a now "normal" PSA

I am 68 years old, and recently my PSA level (which was normal before) increased to 5.2 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml). My doctor repeated the test one month later, and it was normal again at 3.3 ng/ml. Should I still be concerned? More »

Passing your physical exam

Prepare questions before your doctor visit and follow certain guidelines during the exam to maximize the brief time you have with your doctor. (Locked) More »

Preserve your muscle mass

While most men will lose about 30% of their muscle mass during their lifetime, it is possible to rebuild and maintain muscle with a progressive resistance training program and a higher-protein diet. More »