Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Hormones and your heart

Age-related drops in sex hormone levels sometimes cause undesirable symptoms in both women and men. For women, hormone therapy (estrogen and progestins) can address those symptoms but should not be used for the purpose of reducing cardiovascular risk. A free mobile app called MenPro can help women understand their treatment options, based on their risk of heart disease. For older men, testosterone therapy may moderately improve sexual function but does not appear to improve mood or walking speed. But because there are no large, long-term studies of testosterone therapy in men, the heart risks are unknown. (Locked) More »

Radiation: Another treatment choice for prostate cancer

Men diagnosed with prostate cancer have another choice of treatment besides active surveillance or prostate removal surgery: radiation therapy. It is less invasive than surgery and can be used for all four stages of clinical prostate cancer—from low-risk stage 1 to intermediate stage 2 to high-risk stages 3 and 4. (Locked) More »

Unveiling post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious and potentially debilitating condition that can occur in people who have experienced a natural disaster, war, terrorism, serious accident, sudden death of a loved one, violent personal assault, or other life-threatening events. In fact, research suggests that 70% of men ages 65 and older have been exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event during their lifetime. PTSD is often difficult to diagnose because many of its symptoms overlap with depression. But most people recover when treated early. (Locked) More »

Are there any advantages to human growth hormone?

The hype around human growth hormone (HGH) comes from a few studies that showed HGH injections can increase lean body mass and shrink body fat, which led to claims of HGH as an “anti-aging” hormone. Yet, the benefits of HGH supplementation for older adults are unproven, and there are concerns about potential side effects. (Locked) More »

Can vitamin D levels signal aggressive prostate cancer?

Low levels of vitamin D may help predict aggressive prostate cancer, according to new research. While it only showed an association, the researchers believe low D levels could be used as a valuable biomarker, and help men and their doctors decide whether to consider active surveillance, in which the cancer is monitored for changes.   More »

How much weight loss is cause for concern?

It is normal to lose some weight as a person ages. In fact, an estimated 10% to 20% of men older than age 65 lose 5% or more of their body weight over the rest of their lifetime. However, losing 5% of total weight in one year or 10% over two years warrants some medical testing. (Locked) More »

What a therapist can do for you

Mental health is just as important as physical health and proper nutrition, and ignoring negative feelings can have a profound impact on all aspects of a person’s life. During these difficult times, men can benefit from seeing a therapist, who can help identify the source of their problems and then help resolve them.  (Locked) More »