Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Join the healthy heart trend

A recent report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found the rates for heart disease among people ages 60 and older have fallen from 19.5% to 14.9% in the past decade. Three factors may explain the drop in heart disease rates, according to the survey researchers: better diet, increased physical activity, and more use of drug therapy like aspirin therapy and statins. More »

Meditation may ease anxiety from active surveillance

A mindfulness-based stress reduction program (MBSR) can help control anxiety among men who follow active surveillance for prostate cancer. The wait-and-see approach can make men feel so uneasy about their condition that they opt for treatment with radiation therapy or surgery when it is unnecessary. MBSR not only eases anxiety levels, but also inspires men to be more proactive about their health and adopt lifestyle changes like a proper diet and exercise. More »

Walking while golfing: Is this sufficient exercise?

Studies of golfers have found that playing 18 holes is about equal to brisk walking in terms of intensity—even though golf walking is stop-and-go. However, in order to gain the maximum cardiovascular benefit from exercise, people may want to add a day or two of higher-intensity activities, such as running, tennis, or something similar that raises your heart rate. (Locked) More »

Feel your pain: The health risk of migraines in men

While migraines tend to affect more women, migraines in men do happen. An estimated 9% of men are regular sufferers. Genetics also play a role since approximately 70% of sufferers have a close relative with the problem. Unlike other types of headaches-- tension and cluster headaches, for example--migraines can interfere with sleep and daily functions. People who suffer from frequent migraines are also more likely to have other health issues, such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, and restless legs syndrome, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Headaches: Relieving and preventing migraines and other headaches, published by Harvard Health Publications. Ongoing research has suggested that migraines are also associated with an increased heart attack risk and stroke risk.  One of the main Harvard studies that looked exclusively at the link between migraines in men and the risk of cardiovascular disease examined 20,084 men age 40 to 84 who participated in the Physicians' Health Study and completed detailed medical questionnaires each year to record their health status. It was reported that having migraines boosts the risk of heart attacks by 42%. A study in the journal Neurology found that migraine sufferers are twice as likely to have heart attacks as people without migraines. In that study, heart attack risk was higher among those whose migraine was accompanied by auras. Sufferers also were 50% more likely to have key risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. More »

Is it always important to get a second medical opinion?

Men should always seek out a second medical opinion anytime they are given a diagnosis of serious illness or a recommendation for surgery. Also, when seeking a second opinion, it is best to visit a different medical center to get a truly independent diagnosis, and to bring along a family member or friend to accurately record the new information. (Locked) More »

Redefining a healthy sex life

Older men continue to enjoy active sex lives, according to surveys. Embracing how his body and mind have changed can help a man focus more on romance, intimacy, and closeness, which can make sex more enjoyable for him and his partner. (Locked) More »

The major impact of ministrokes

A transient ischemic attack, or TIA, also known as a ministroke, is a warning sign of a possible full stroke. While the symptoms resemble a regular stroke, they often go unnoticed because they last a short time. But recognizing them can help you seek immediate medical care and possibly protect yourself from a more severe and damaging stroke.  (Locked) More »

Why you should heed a ministroke

Transient ischemic attacks signal “silent” brain damage and impending stroke. Prompt treatment can minimize damage and prevent strokes. Controlling blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels, along with a healthy lifestyle, can prevent TIAs. (Locked) More »

You can protect yourself against superbugs

Infections of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are increasing. People can reduce the risk by washing hands regularly, having recommended vaccines, taking antibiotics only as prescribed, and choosing organic meat, poultry, and dairy. (Locked) More »

Unveiling post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious and potentially debilitating condition that can occur in people who have experienced a natural disaster, war, terrorism, serious accident, sudden death of a loved one, violent personal assault, or other life-threatening events. In fact, research suggests that 70% of men ages 65 and older have been exposed to at least one potentially traumatic event during their lifetime. PTSD is often difficult to diagnose because many of its symptoms overlap with depression. But most people recover when treated early. (Locked) More »