Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Not satisfied with your sex life?

Erectile dysfunction usually stems from inadequate blood supply to the penis, but other causes can contribute. Diagnosing it and getting the right treatment requires a frank conversation with a doctor about your sexual function. Full sexual function requires sufficient arousal before intercourse. The most widely used drugs for erectile problems work in most men, but insurance coverage is limited, and they have potential side effects. (Locked) More »

Vasectomy and prostate cancer

Vasectomy has been linked to higher risk of eventually being diagnosed with prostate cancer, but there is no convincing proof that one actually causes the other. (Locked) More »

Active older men live longer

A study found that men who were active at any intensity for at least 30 minutes a day, six days per week, were 40% less likely to die from any cause. More »

Tests for hidden heart disease

Electrocardiograms and exercise stress tests are not recommended for checking otherwise healthy men for hidden heart disease. Traditional cardiac risk factors provide a more accurate assessment of heart attack risk than screening tests do. The key factors are age, body mass index, family history, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and whether you smoke or have diabetes. A test called a coronary artery calcium scan can help men make decisions about preventive heart care in certain circumstances. (Locked) More »

Prostate cancer: Treat or wait?

After prostate cancer diagnosis, certain men with low-risk cancers can choose to monitor the cancer very closely and treat when the disease progresses. This allows a man to delay or avoid the risks of treatment. The approach is called active surveillance with intention to treat. Bothersome and potentially permanent side effects of treatment include erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. By choosing active surveillance, some men can avoid the risks of treating a cancer that may be unlikely to cause them serious harm within their life span.     (Locked) More »