Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when the body has trouble using the sugar it gets from food for energy. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar can have immediate effects, like blurry vision. It can also cause problems over time, like heart disease and blindness.

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile-onset diabetes) and type 2 diabetes (once called adult-onset diabetes). Both are caused by problems making or using insulin, a hormone that makes it possible for cells to use glucose, also known as blood sugar, for energy.

When you eat, your body breaks down carbohydrates into a simple sugar called glucose. It also produces a hormone called insulin that signals the body's cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin, or stops making it altogether. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body's cells don't respond to insulin. Either way, since sugar can't get into cells, it builds up in the bloodstream. 

Too much sugar in the blood can cause a range of uncomfortable symptoms. These include:

  • blurry vision
  • intense thirst
  • need to urinate often
  • fatigue
  • numbness or tingling in the hands or feet

Type 1 diabetes often comes on suddenly. It usually strikes children and teenagers, but can appear later in life. It is an autoimmune disease, meaning it happens because the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the body's insulin-making cells. Type 1 diabetes can't be cured, but it can be managed by taking insulin before eating.

Type 2 diabetes takes longer to develop. It can begin any time from childhood onward. Type 2 diabetes is usually triggered by being overweight or obese and not getting much physical activity. Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes weight loss if needed, daily exercise, a healthy diet, and medications.

Diabetes Articles

Are you on the road to a diabetes diagnosis?

Having a higher-than-normal blood sugar level (100 and 125 mg/dL) is known as prediabetes, a condition that puts people at risk for diabetes and heart disease. Most people with prediabetes are overweight, and excess fat in the abdominal area is especially risky. Belly fat makes hormones and other substances that trigger chronic inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance and sets the stage for prediabetes. Weight loss and exercise can help reverse the problem. (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Does psoriasis raise diabetes risk?

Some experts feel there is evidence that probiotics may help prevent or treat several conditions, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, travelers’ diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and some allergies (particularly eczema). (Locked) More »

Moderate alcohol consumption may reduce diabetes risk

The American Diabetes Association counsels women with diabetes to follow the recommendations for alcohol consumption that apply to most adult women: a drink a day is fine, especially because it may reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.  More »

Why your gums are so important to your health

Periodontal disease, the leading cause of adult tooth loss, is an inflammatory condition that may increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. The best defenses are regular brushing and flossing, along with not smoking. More »

Rising blood sugar: How to turn it around

High blood sugar (glucose) is an early warning sign of diabetes. It also suggests a need to lose weight and exercise more. Men should have their glucose tested periodically. Once every three years is sufficient for men not at high risk of diabetes. (Locked) More »

Getting to the heart of kidney disease

Heart disease and kidney failure are linked by two powerful underlying risk factors: diabetes and high blood pressure, each of which damages the heart and kidneys independently. Underlying the connection is a breakdown in metabolic signaling that affects blood sugar, blood pressure, sodium levels, and fat storage. Both environmental and genetic forces are probably involved in creating the malfunction. Keeping blood pressure and blood sugar levels in an acceptable range can help preserve heart health and kidney function. (Locked) More »