Cancer

Cancer is the catchall term applied to diseases caused by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Cancer isn't one disease. It is many different diseases, more than 100 and counting.

Each kind of cancer is usually named for the cell type in which it begins — cancer that starts in a lung is called lung cancer; cancer that starts in pigment cells in the skin, which are known as melanocytes, is called melanoma.

When detected and treated early, cancer can often be stopped. That said, cancer is a leading cause of death and disability around the world.

Cancer Articles

As an ex-smoker, am I still at high risk for lung cancer?

Quitting smoking is the best health move any person can make. Improved lung function and lower heart attack risk can happen almost immediately after someone quits smoking, but it takes more than 10 years of not smoking to see a dramatic decrease in cancer risk. (Locked) More »

The family history of cancer

Family history can be one of the first lines of defense in preventing cancer. Knowing the detailed history of cancer on both sides of a man’s family can protect him, and even his children, by preventing cancers before they develop and helping to diagnose cancers early. (Locked) More »

Top screenings to avoid cancer

Getting routine cancer screenings can help find cancer early, when it’s easier to treat. Several screenings are recommended for people at average risk for cancer, such as colonoscopy for men and women and mammograms and Pap smears for women. Some screenings are not recommended routinely, but may be important, such as low-dose computed tomography to detect early signs of lung cancer, or a visual skin exam by a doctor to screen for skin cancer. (Locked) More »

A new look at colon cancer screening

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths and the third most common cancer in men. Screening tests to help find and often remove polyps before they become cancer are recommended for men ages 50 to 75, yet many avoid them. To help highlight the urgency for regular colon cancer screenings, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued updated recommendations and described tests that might be a better option than an invasive colonoscopy, especially for lower-risk men. More »

Adapting to life after cancer

Once you’ve completed therapy, you may face a new set of challenges to your health and well-being, including late effects of treatment, the fear of recurrence, and altered relationships. Your health-care team can help you deal with them. (Locked) More »

Cancer and diet: What’s the connection?

Much research has suggested that certain foods and nutrients may help prevent—or, conversely, contribute to—certain types of cancer. While it is not 100% certain that consuming more or less of certain foods or nutrients will guarantee cancer protection, science has found that processed meats, high-glycemic-index foods, calcium, and antioxidant-rich foods may have the greatest influence on a person’s risk.  (Locked) More »

Gum disease may signal warning for pancreatic cancer

Research has found that people with high levels of the oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis had a 59% greater risk of developing pancreatic cancer. It is too early to say whether this specific bacterium directly contributes to the disease. However, one theory is that since inflammation is related to cancer, the bacteria could cause inflammation in the pancreas. Another possibility is the bacteria are simply a marker for cancer-causing inflammation.  More »