September 2011 references and further reading

Boden WE, O'Rourke RA, Teo KK, Hartigan PM, Maron DJ, Kostuk WJ, Knudtson M, Dada M, Casperson P, Harris CL, Chaitman BR, Shaw L, Gosselin G, Nawaz S, Title LM, Gau G, Blaustein AS, Booth DC, Bates ER, Spertus JA, Berman DS, Mancini GB, Weintraub WS. Optimal medical therapy with or without PCI for stable coronary disease. New England Journal of Medicine 2007; 356:1503-16. Borden WB, Redberg RF, Mushlin AI, Dai D, Kaltenbach LA, Spertus JA. Patterns and intensity of medical therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. JAMA 2011; 305:1882-9. Maron DJ, Boden WE, Weintraub WS, Calfas KJ, O'Rourke RA. Is optimal medical therapy as used in the COURAGE trial feasible for widespread use? Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine 2011; 13:16-25. (Locked) More »

Sodium, potassium together influence heart health

Sodium in table salt boosts blood pressure and contributes to cardiovascular disease. Potassium keeps blood pressure in check. A new report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey suggests that — more sodium than potassium — contributes to heart disease and premature death. Here are some foods rich in potassium and low in sodium. (Locked) More »

COURAGE not followed by action

The results of the COURAGE trial were expected to change the attitude of doctors regarding angioplasty procedures, but it seems that this shift has not happened. To be fair, optimal medical therapy as done in the COURAGE trial isn't easy. From the patient's perspective, it takes commitment and effort. On the health care side, doctors receive little or nothing for providing counseling and preventive services. (Locked) More »

Peripheral artery disease often goes untreated

Peripheral artery disease often goes untreated until it is too late, and research suggests that millions of people with peripheral artery disease are not taking the appropriate medications to control it. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers from Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital estimated that at least two-thirds of the seven million American adults with peripheral artery disease aren't taking a statin, an ACE inhibitor, and/or aspirin, medicines known to protect arteries and the heart (Circulation, July 5, 2011). (Locked) More »