Cold out? Why you need to wear a hat!

Blood vessels in the surface of the head constrict very little in response to cold, which is a good thing because the brain needs a steady supply of blood. There's little subcutaneous fat for insulation. As a result, even if the rest of your body is nicely wrapped up, if your head is uncovered you'll lose lots of body heat — potentially up to 50% of it — in certain cold-weather conditions. What's more, a cold head can trigger blood vessel constriction in the other parts of the body, so it can make your hands and feet feel cold even if you are wearing mittens and warm socks and shoes. The solution, of course, is to wear a hat. (Locked) More »

What is a tailor's bunion?

A bunion on the little toe is commonly called a tailor's bunion.  The main cause of tailor's bunions are narrow shoes — especially those with high heels — that don't have enough room for the toes, so the big and little ones get scrunched and pushed toward the middle three. Tailor's bunions can be treated in a commonsensical fashion. People can wear shoes wide enough to comfortably accommodate their toes, or use shoe stretchers that create a little more space for the widest part of the foot. Moleskin or little silicone shields can be used to pad the protuberances. (Locked) More »

Niacin + a statin does not add up to benefit

In 2011, federal health officials ended an important government-funded clinical trial designed to test whether taking niacin in addition to a cholesterol-lowering statin might do more to lower heart attack and stroke risk than just taking a statin alone. Interim data indicated that the niacin had no benefit and may have been associated with a small, unexplained increase in stroke risk. (Locked) More »