Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Could your breast implants be making you sick?

Many women are reporting symptoms they believe are associated with their breast implants. Sometimes called breast implant illness, this combination of vague symptoms—such as hair loss, fatigue, anxiety, and depression—is also associated with a number of other conditions, including menopause, thyroid problems, and autoimmune conditions. Researchers are now working with patient advocacy groups to better understand the problem. Experts recommend that women understand the potential risks and benefits of breast implants before having the surgical procedure. (Locked) More »

The growing problem of drug-resistant UTIs

A growing number of urinary tract infections are now resistant to common antibiotics. This makes them harder to treat and raises the potential that women will develop complications, such as kidney or blood infections. Women can help protect themselves from UTIs by following good hygiene practices and staying well hydrated. (Locked) More »

Can I do anything to prevent osteoporosis?

Many risk factors for osteoporosis, such as sex, age, and genes, are not modifiable. But women at risk can make changes to improve bone health, such as not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption, exercising more, and adopting a healthy diet rich in calcium and getting enough vitamin D. More »

Hair thinning? Get to the root of the problem

Female hair loss is a common problem. Causes of hair loss in women range from pregnancy and hormonal shifts to genetic causes or illness. Some hair loss is also caused by overuse of styling products and tools. Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause, but can include everything from medication to hair transplant surgery. (Locked) More »

Hormones and breast cancer: What you should know

Hormone therapy is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. A new study shows that risk is higher with both estrogen-only hormone therapy and progesterone-estrogen combination therapy. In addition, women who take hormones for a longer time have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. If a woman opts to take hormone therapy, it should be for as short a period as possible to manage symptoms. (Locked) More »

Hot flashes and heart health

Results of a recent study suggest a link between frequent and persistent hot flashes and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. However, even among women who had more hot flashes, the overall odds of having a heart-related event was still low. Since most women experience hot flashes around the time of menopause, more research is needed to better define the frequency and severity of hot flashes that would warrant extra attention to cardiovascular risk. (Locked) More »

Is bladder training really beneficial?

Bladder training is a strategy that people suffering from urinary frequency or overactive bladder might try to improve their condition. It involves urinating on a schedule, gradually extending the time between bathroom visits, to improve bladder function. More »

If you have diabetes, a crop of new medicines may help your heart

New diabetes medications can help individuals at high risk for a stroke or heart attack. The benefit is primarily for people who have had a heart attack or stroke in the past or are at very high risk because of other factors. While these medications can benefit some individuals, they do have a number of side effects, are costly, and are not recommended for most people with diabetes. (Locked) More »