Vision

Vision Articles

Are you at risk for a secondary cataract?

Sometimes a side effect of cataract surgery triggers the return of cataract symptoms. The side effect is called posterior capsule opacification, also known as a secondary cataract. It occurs when cells from the old cataract remain in the eye and continue to grow, blocking the light to the retina. An eye doctor can treat this problem with YAG laser capsulotomy, a simple, quick, and painless laser procedure that clears a pathway for light to travel to the retina. More »

What to do when reading gets harder

Many aspects of health in older age can affect the ability to read, such as poor vision, pain, hand tremors, and difficulty concentrating. Treating an underlying condition can help (such as getting a new pair of reading glasses). And sometimes all it takes to improve reading is using a few strategies. If it’s painful to hold a book, one can try propping it up on a pillow or book holder. For vision challenges, electronic reading devices and large-print books can help greatly. When attention is the challenge, reading in a quiet space or reading out loud can help. (Locked) More »

A look at better vision

For many older adults with increasing poor vision who may have cataracts, or get them in the future, lens replacement surgery (LRS) may be a good option, as it addresses both problems. LRS replaces the natural lens in an eye with a synthetic lens called an intraocular lens, which can correct vision problems so a person no longer needs glasses and will not develop cataracts in the future. More »

Common eye problems and how to fix them

Eyes often develop minor problems, becoming dry, gooey, itchy, or watery. Many symptoms are temporary and can be treated at home. For example, dry or burning eyes can be treated with artificial tears; itchy eyes can be relieved with antihistamines. However, if a symptom is persistent and has been going on for many days or there’s something that’s severe for a shorter period, it may be time to visit a doctor. An ophthalmologist or an optometrist can help. More »

Can your eyes see Alzheimer’s disease in your future?

Research shows that people with certain eye diseases, specifically glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, appear to have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease. The underlying link for these conditions may be related to their common risk factors, including smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels. (Locked) More »

What can I do about poor night vision?

Summary: As people age, trouble seeing at night becomes a common issue. Getting an eye exam to update prescriptions and look for common age-related eye problems can help improve vision. More »