Vision

Vision Articles

Can your eyes see Alzheimer’s disease in your future?

Research shows that people with certain eye diseases, specifically glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, appear to have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease. The underlying link for these conditions may be related to their common risk factors, including smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels. (Locked) More »

What can I do about poor night vision?

Summary: As people age, trouble seeing at night becomes a common issue. Getting an eye exam to update prescriptions and look for common age-related eye problems can help improve vision. More »

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

6 ways to improve and protect your vision

Healthy habits help protect one’s vision and independence. These include eating a healthy diet with foods that are rich in antioxidants, such as leafy greens; quitting smoking; controlling underlying conditions (like diabetes) that increase the risk for vision problems; and getting regular comprehensive eye exams. Using artificial tears can relieve the gritty feeling of dry eyes and sometimes improves vision. It’s also helpful to protect the eyes by wearing sunglasses when outside or safety glasses when doing work around the house. (Locked) More »

What should you do about those unpleasant eye floaters?

For some people, debris from the vitreous in the eye may wind up floating around. These “floaters” may interfere with vision and become bothersome. Options include getting used to them, which becomes easier over time, or undergoing surgery to remove them. Another option that’s not currently recommended is a laser procedure called YAG vitreolysis, which vaporizes floaters with heat. The procedure is controversial, mainly because some doctors have been offering it since the early 1990s without solid evidence about its safety and effectiveness. Recent research suggests YAG vitreolysis may deserve more investigation. More »

Most people with pinkeye get unnecessary treatment

People who get simple pinkeye with redness, itching, and mild discomfort usually don’t need antibiotic eye drops since most cases are due to a virus or allergy. They can use artificial tears and compresses until the eye heals on its own within one to two weeks. More »