Vision

Vision Articles

Common physical problems that threaten your driving skills

There are many physical changes that can affect driving skills. For example, arthritis pain may make it hard to grip a steering wheel, get in and out of a car, or push the pedals; hearing loss can make it harder to detect hazards, such as an ambulance approaching an intersection. Driving assessment programs can help people find out if their conditions are impairing their road skills. The goal of such programs is to keep people in the driver’s seat, so that they can stay safe, mobile, and independent for as long as possible. (Locked) More »

Focus on easier reading

At some point, almost all people need reading glasses as their eyes naturally lose the ability to focus up close, a condition called presbyopia. People also may get extra reading assistance by using desk magnifiers, lubricating the eyes with artificial tears, and installing proper lighting. More »

Corneal Transplant

The cornea is the clear, round, "window" of tissue that allows light to enter the front of the eye. If the cornea becomes severely diseased or damaged, it can distort or even block the normal path of light into the eye. When this happens, light does not focus normally on the retina, the layer at the back of the eye that is responsible for sight. As a result, there can be a significant loss of vision in the affected eye. When corneal conditions cause serious, irreversible vision problems, a corneal transplant often is the best solution. In a corneal transplant, an eye surgeon first removes the diseased or damaged area of cornea. The removed tissue then is replaced by a section of healthy cornea that has been taken from the eye of a dead donor. (Locked) More »

Snellen Test for Visual Acuity

A Snellen test uses a chart with different sizes of letters or forms to evaluate your visual acuity-that is, the sharpness of your vision. The test shows how accurately you can see from a distance. No preparation is necessary. You stand or sit at a specific distance from the eye chart. Usually you are told to cover one eye with a cardboard piece or with your hand while you read letters with the other eye and say them out loud for the doctor. (Locked) More »

Tonometry

Tonometry is a test to measure pressure in your eyeball. High pressure inside the eye is caused by a disease called glaucoma, which can damage your vision if it is not treated. Remove any contact lenses. Tell your doctor if you have an eye infection or other type of eye problem. The pressure inside your eye is always measured from the outside. In most cases, if you are at an eye clinic, the pressure can even be measured without anything actually touching your eye. The eye doctor has you look up close at an instrument that blows a small puff of air onto your eye. It then uses a special sensor (like a tiny radar detector) to detect the amount of indentation that the air puff causes on the surface of the eye. This indentation is normal and lasts for only a fraction of a second. (Locked) More »

Are you at risk for a secondary cataract?

Sometimes a side effect of cataract surgery triggers the return of cataract symptoms. The side effect is called posterior capsule opacification, also known as a secondary cataract. It occurs when cells from the old cataract remain in the eye and continue to grow, blocking the light to the retina. An eye doctor can treat this problem with YAG laser capsulotomy, a simple, quick, and painless laser procedure that clears a pathway for light to travel to the retina. More »

What to do when reading gets harder

Many aspects of health in older age can affect the ability to read, such as poor vision, pain, hand tremors, and difficulty concentrating. Treating an underlying condition can help (such as getting a new pair of reading glasses). And sometimes all it takes to improve reading is using a few strategies. If it’s painful to hold a book, one can try propping it up on a pillow or book holder. For vision challenges, electronic reading devices and large-print books can help greatly. When attention is the challenge, reading in a quiet space or reading out loud can help. (Locked) More »

A look at better vision

For many older adults with increasing poor vision who may have cataracts, or get them in the future, lens replacement surgery (LRS) may be a good option, as it addresses both problems. LRS replaces the natural lens in an eye with a synthetic lens called an intraocular lens, which can correct vision problems so a person no longer needs glasses and will not develop cataracts in the future. More »