Vision

Vision Articles

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

6 ways to improve and protect your vision

Healthy habits help protect one’s vision and independence. These include eating a healthy diet with foods that are rich in antioxidants, such as leafy greens; quitting smoking; controlling underlying conditions (like diabetes) that increase the risk for vision problems; and getting regular comprehensive eye exams. Using artificial tears can relieve the gritty feeling of dry eyes and sometimes improves vision. It’s also helpful to protect the eyes by wearing sunglasses when outside or safety glasses when doing work around the house. (Locked) More »

What should you do about those unpleasant eye floaters?

For some people, debris from the vitreous in the eye may wind up floating around. These “floaters” may interfere with vision and become bothersome. Options include getting used to them, which becomes easier over time, or undergoing surgery to remove them. Another option that’s not currently recommended is a laser procedure called YAG vitreolysis, which vaporizes floaters with heat. The procedure is controversial, mainly because some doctors have been offering it since the early 1990s without solid evidence about its safety and effectiveness. Recent research suggests YAG vitreolysis may deserve more investigation. More »

Most people with pinkeye get unnecessary treatment

People who get simple pinkeye with redness, itching, and mild discomfort usually don’t need antibiotic eye drops since most cases are due to a virus or allergy. They can use artificial tears and compresses until the eye heals on its own within one to two weeks. More »

Ways to stay sharp behind the wheel

Many aspects of aging affect the ability to drive, such as poor vision, hearing impairment, loss of muscle mass, and changes in thinking skills. Addressing underlying health conditions and getting an evaluation from a driver assessment program can help older adults improve weaknesses in driving. Other tips to stay safer behind the wheel include cutting down on driving distractions, such as cellphones, loud music, or chatter; limiting exposure to busy traffic, and avoiding driving in bad weather. (Locked) More »

Electronic screen alert: Avoid this vision risk

Looking at a computer or smartphone screen for long periods can lead to computer vision syndrome, which may include dry eyes or eyestrain. Symptoms include blurry vision, discomfort, or headaches. One solution is to take a break from electronic screens every 15 to 30 minutes, just for a minute. Using artificial tears and wearing the proper eyeglasses can also reduce symptoms. So can sitting a few feet away from a computer screen, using softer lighting to reduce screen glare, and using a larger font so it’s easier to see letters on a screen. More »

Keep on driving

An older man’s health tends to go downhill after he loses the ability to drive. Driving keeps men more independent and increases their ability to socialize, visit the doctor, or go exercise. The best ways to ensure men stay behind the wheel is to sharpen certain physical and cognitive skills, as well as reviewing other aspects that affect driving ability, such as medication side effects and car accessories. (Locked) More »