Vision

Vision Articles

A look at better vision

For many older adults with increasing poor vision who may have cataracts, or get them in the future, lens replacement surgery (LRS) may be a good option, as it addresses both problems. LRS replaces the natural lens in an eye with a synthetic lens called an intraocular lens, which can correct vision problems so a person no longer needs glasses and will not develop cataracts in the future. More »

Common eye problems and how to fix them

Eyes often develop minor problems, becoming dry, gooey, itchy, or watery. Many symptoms are temporary and can be treated at home. For example, dry or burning eyes can be treated with artificial tears; itchy eyes can be relieved with antihistamines. However, if a symptom is persistent and has been going on for many days or there’s something that’s severe for a shorter period, it may be time to visit a doctor. An ophthalmologist or an optometrist can help. More »

Can your eyes see Alzheimer’s disease in your future?

Research shows that people with certain eye diseases, specifically glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, appear to have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease. The underlying link for these conditions may be related to their common risk factors, including smoking, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels. (Locked) More »

What can I do about poor night vision?

Summary: As people age, trouble seeing at night becomes a common issue. Getting an eye exam to update prescriptions and look for common age-related eye problems can help improve vision. More »

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

6 ways to improve and protect your vision

Healthy habits help protect one’s vision and independence. These include eating a healthy diet with foods that are rich in antioxidants, such as leafy greens; quitting smoking; controlling underlying conditions (like diabetes) that increase the risk for vision problems; and getting regular comprehensive eye exams. Using artificial tears can relieve the gritty feeling of dry eyes and sometimes improves vision. It’s also helpful to protect the eyes by wearing sunglasses when outside or safety glasses when doing work around the house. (Locked) More »