Shoulders

Shoulders Articles

Don’t shrug off shoulder pain

Shoulder pain is common among older adults. Causes include arthritis, rotator cuff tears, tendinitis, impingement, and bursitis. The first line of treatment is typically a course of physical therapy. For impingement and tendinitis, treatment may include a cortisone injection first, and then physical therapy when inflammation has subsided. Physical therapy focuses on strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and the shoulder blade muscles, improving posture, and increasing range of motion with exercises that rotate the shoulder. (Locked) More »

Warming up a frozen shoulder

While everyday shoulder aches and stiffness are common, if pain and mobility become substantially worse over time, you may have a condition called adhesive capsulitis, also known as frozen shoulder. While it can be surprising and sometimes scary when it happens to you, the condition is a relatively benign disease that often resolves on its own. You just need to know how to deal with it if it happens. (Locked) More »

Keep your shoulders strong to stay independent

In older age, the shoulders become vulnerable to health problems and pain that may curtail activity. Fortunately, most older adults can reduce pain and improve shoulder strength without surgery. Therapy typically focuses on three keys to restoring shoulder health: improving posture, strengthening the muscles that support the shoulder, and stretching. Posture exercises aim to reverse forward-shoulder positions. Strengthening focuses on the rotator cuff muscles and the shoulder blade muscles. The muscles that must be stretched for shoulder health are in the front of the body and on top of the shoulders. (Locked) More »

Where does it hurt?

The Harvard Health Decision Guides help you determine the appropriate next steps to alleviate your pain. More »

7 stretching & strengthening exercises for a frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder (also known as adhesive capsulitis) is a condition in which the shoulder is stiff, painful, and has limited motion in all directions. Stretching exercises are usually the cornerstone of treating frozen shoulder. Always warm up your shoulder before performing your exercises. The best way to do that is to take a warm shower or bath for 10 to 15 minutes. You can also use a moist heating pad or damp towel heated in the microwave, but it may not be as effective. More »

Frozen shoulder

Most of us don't think twice about taking a book off an overhead shelf, reaching an arm back to put on a coat, or rolling a bowling ball. But if you have a frozen shoulder (also called adhesive capsulitis), these simple movements can be painful and nearly impossible. Frozen shoulder is the temporary loss of normal range of motion in the shoulder. It tends to get worse, and can lead to considerable disability. The condition typically affects adults over age 40, and women more often than men. Experts don't fully understand what causes frozen shoulder. An inflammatory process is probably involved. Often a shoulder freezes up because it hasn't been used for a while because of pain, injury, surgery, or illness. In most cases, a frozen shoulder can be unfrozen, although full recovery may take months and a lot of self-help. More »

Rotator Cuff Injury

Four tendons attach muscles from the shoulder blade and ribs to the upper arm bone (humerus). Because these tendons help to rotate the arm within its socket, this sleeve of tendons is called the rotator cuff. Tendons in the rotator cuff can be injured easily because they move within a tight space. When the shoulder is turned or lifted at the limit of its natural range of movement, the tendons in this tight space are moved, too. Occasionally, the rotator cuff tendons can bump or rub against a bony knob (the acromion) above them or against a ligament at the front of the shoulder. (Locked) More »