Men's Sexual Health

Sex is an important part of life. For many men, thinking about sex starts early, often before puberty, and lasts until their final days on earth.

On one level, sex is just another hormone-driven bodily function designed to perpetuate the species. On another, it's a pleasurable activity. It's also an activity that can help cement the bonds between two people.

Sexual health refers to a state of well-being that lets a man fully participate in and enjoy sexual activity. A range of physical, psychological, interpersonal, and social factors influence a man's sexual health.

Optimal male sexual health includes sexual desire (libido) and the ability to get and sustain an erection (erectile function). Although physiology can affect both the desire for sex and the ability to have sex, mental health and emotional factors also play important roles.

Male sexual health isn't merely the absence of disease. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get an erection or to maintain it long enough for satisfying sexual activity. Many things can cause ED, including stress, depression, relationship issues, abnormally low testosterone, damage from urological surgery, and even cholesterol-clogged arteries. In fact, it is often an early warning sign for heart disease. ED can be treated with pills, injections into the penis, or devices.  Men can also experience difficulties related to ejaculation, including premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, or the inability to experience orgasm upon ejaculation (anorgasmia).

 

Male sexual health also covers the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases and the assessment and treatment of male infertility.

Men's Sexual Health Articles

Did my partner get her bladder infection from me?

Men do not have to worry about getting bladder infections from their female partners. Women can get urinary tract infections after sex, but this is a result of irritation at the opening of the urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to enter. (Locked) More »

The heart of a healthy sex life

Most men who have had a heart attack or heart surgery can resume their normal sex life after a brief recovery period. Other factors, like medication and severity, come into play. Still, the general guideline is that men can resume their regular sexual activity two weeks after a heart attack. After surgery, they can have sex once the incision has healed. (Locked) More »

Prostate cancer and your sex life

Common treatments and management of prostate cancer, such as active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and androgen deprivation therapy, also can affect a man’s sex life. Side effects may include poor sexual function, low libido, and erectile dysfunction. Understanding how these changes occur can help men in their choice of treatment. (Locked) More »

What does blood in my semen mean?

Blood in the semen can occur after a medical procedure, like a prostate biopsy, an enlarged prostate, or injury to the testicles or prostate, such as from horseback riding or bicycling. The condition often goes away on its own, but if it continues for more than three weeks, men should see their doctor. (Locked) More »

Will a pill really help your sex life?

Erectile dysfunction drugs are more readily available than ever before, and in general, men have gotten past any stigma about needing them to get or maintain an erection. Yet many men approach ED drugs the wrong way and think the pills can fix problems in their sex lives that are related to mental or emotional issues. (Locked) More »

Eating more nuts may improve sexual function

A recent study found that men who added 60 grams — about ½ cup or 360 calories—of a nut mixture made from almonds, hazelnuts, and walnuts to their daily diet was associated with improvement in several aspects of their sexual life. More »

Straight talk about your new sex life

Men and women go through all kinds of physical and emotional changes as they age that can affect their sex life as well as their relationship. These changes are often embarrassing or difficult to talk about, but communicating about them to each other can help couples find solutions and common ground. (Locked) More »

Can blood pressure medications interfere with my sex drive?

Certain blood pressure medications may cause sexual side effects like erectile dysfunction and a low sex drive. If the problem persists, a man should speak with his doctor about changing medications, lowering dosages, or exploring other possible health reasons. (Locked) More »

Sex hormones and your heart

As people age, the natural decline in sex hormone levels sometimes causes undesirable symptoms, including hot flashes and a flagging sex drive. Thanks to new evidence, information about the cardiovascular safety of estrogen and testosterone therapy has shifted over the years. For women with uncomfortable, frequent hot flashes that disrupt their sleep and daily function, hormone therapy is an option for those who are not at high cardiovascular risk. Men with troubling sexual dysfunction and fatigue may want to ask their doctor about checking their testosterone levels. In men ages 65 and older with low levels, testosterone therapy may improve libido and sexual satisfaction. (Locked) More »

The buzz about caffeine and health

For most people, consuming caffeine from coffee, tea, or chocolate poses no serious health risk if taken within safe amounts. Healthy people who have never had a heart attack or currently manage high blood pressure should consume no more than 400 mg per day, which is about the amount in four cups of coffee or 10 cups of black tea. However, people who have had a prior heart attack or have heart disease should keep their dosage to about half that per day. (Locked) More »