Knees

Knees Articles

The far-reaching effects of a little bit of weight loss

Losing 5% of one’s total body weight can result in clinically significant physiologic changes. For example, losing a little weight can reduce heartburn, knee pain, blood pressure, and diabetes risk. Losing 5% of one’s body weight may also lead to better sexual function, more restorative sleep, extra energy, and more self-esteem. To reach a 5% reduction in total body weight, it helps to exercise; eat a healthy diet rich in lean proteins, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds; and get enough sleep. (Locked) More »

When is it time for a knee replacement?

Deciding whether knee replacement surgery is necessary depends on the symptoms, the extent of joint damage, how much the joint problems limit daily activities and how well other treatments are working. Consulting with an orthopedic surgeon or a rheumatologist can help people make the best decision. (Locked) More »

Helpful or harmful? Weighing last resorts before knee surgery

When trying to avoid surgery for knee osteoarthritis, one must be wary of certain treatments to relieve pain. Some treatments are ineffective or potentially dangerous, such as prolotherapy or ozone injections, stem cell treatments, and implanted shock absorbers. Other treatments—such as acupuncture or platelet-rich plasma injections—might work, but the evidence is mixed. Steroid or hyaluronic injections can provide pain relief. But the safest and most proven approaches for treating knee osteoarthritis are weight loss and muscle strengthening. More »

Oh, my aching knees

Many women experience knee pain, which is often caused by one of three common conditions: patellofemoral pain syndrome, chronic degenerative meniscal tears, and early osteoarthritis. These conditions are common in older women. Most often symptoms produced by these conditions can be relieved by modifying your activities and physical therapy. But in some instances, surgery is warranted, but it’s typically only an option if other strategies haven’t proven effective. More »

Moving away from knee osteoarthritis

An estimated 10% of men ages 60 and older having symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or aspirin, and steroid injections can temporarily soothe arthritis pain and inflammation. But an easier and safer way to manage symptoms is to be more active as bones and cartilage need the stimulation of regular movement to stay healthy and pain free. More »

Age-proof your knees

Numerous strategies can help stave off or prevent knee problems related to osteoarthritis. Boosting muscle strength stabilizes the knee joint and helps absorb stress. Losing weight relieves pressure and pain on the joints. Improving range of motion may reduce symptoms. Other ideas include avoiding high-impact activities such as jogging and aerobics classes that involve jumping, and avoiding long periods of standing on hard surfaces or squatting. Sitting on a low stool while gardening may also help. More »