Asthma

Asthma Articles

COVID-19 or something else?

Many COVID-19 symptoms—such as fever, cough, or muscle aches—overlap with the symptoms of other respiratory conditions, such as influenza, a common cold, or asthma. But there are differences among the conditions. For example, a bout of the flu or a cold will not cause shortness of breath the way COVID-19 will. And while asthma can cause shortness of breath, it won’t cause a fever or body aches the way COVID-19 will. A person who’s experiencing concerning symptoms of respiratory illness should report them to a doctor. More »

Cracking the cough code

 Image: © Wavebreakmedia/Getty Images Dry cough, wet cough, a cough that lingers on — they're all signs of one or more underlying conditions. What does each type of cough indicate, and how do doctors discern the difference? It depends on the type and duration of the cough. A wet, productive cough produces sputum (phlegm or mucus from the lungs or sinuses). The cough sounds soupy and may come with a wheezing or rattling sound and tightness in your chest. (Locked) More »

You’ll breathe easier with an asthma action plan

Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airways. The condition restricts airflow and makes breathing difficult. Because these breathing problems may come on suddenly during a flare-up or an attack, it helps to have an asthma action plan. This plan keeps you and others informed about the strategies you've worked out with your doctor for asthma management. About the asthma action plan More »

Adult asthma linked to higher risk of heart disease

People who develop asthma as adults may have a higher risk of developing heart disease than those without asthma. Adult-onset asthma is often triggered by air pollution and tends to be harder to control than asthma that starts during childhood. More »

The upshot of allergy treatment

Many people try to manage allergies with over-the-counter or prescription medication; however, allergy shots may better control symptoms as well as reduce dependency on allergy drugs. After a three-to-six month build-up phases, people received monthly shots for about three to five years on average.  (Locked) More »

Battling breathlessness

Shortness of breath is one of the most common problems people bring to their doctors. The most obvious causes such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary artery disease are relatively easy to uncover with a battery of standard tests. For some people, however, the source of the problem remains frustratingly elusive. Advanced cardiopulmonary testing that measures heart and lung function during exercise can often provide answers. (Locked) More »