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Is there a cure for my nightly snoring?

Updated: December 01, 2020

Ask the doctors

381db0ee-fbf5-41cd-a038-c5fd10976addQ. My partner says I've been snoring lately. Are there any home remedies I can use to help me stop?

A. Snoring occurs when muscles in your airway relax during sleep, narrowing the airway and making your breath sounds louder as the air forces its way through. There are a number of strategies that can help. Try sleeping on your side instead of your back, which pushes your tongue to the back of your mouth. Clear nasal congestion resulting from allergies or a stuffy nose. Avoid alcohol (which may act as a sedative) and sleep medications known as benzodiazepines, which may cause your airway tissues to relax, making snoring worse. Losing weight can also help, because surplus tissue, caused by weight gain, can put pressure on and compress the airway, making snoring worse. However, if your snoring does not improve, your partner notices that you have periods during the night where your breathing ­appears to stop, or you regularly feel drowsy during the day, it may be time to pay a visit to your doctor. You could have a condition called obstructive sleep apnea, which may require treatment.

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