Your health through the decades

By age 60, all men tend to get thrown together into the so-called 60-and-older group, even though there are often significant differences between a man who is 65 and one who is 85. Certain lifestyle habits need to be maintained, no matter what a man’s age, such as adopting a heart-healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, and continuing a regular exercise routine to build strength, flexibility, and cardio fitness. Yet most men also need to place extra attention on certain aspects of their health depending on whether they are in their 60s, 70s, or 80s. (Locked) More »

The best ways to manage heartburn

Over-the-counter antacids often can help control occasional heartburn, but for recurring episodes, people may benefit from stronger medication like H2 blockers and proton-pump inhibitors. More »

Do nail changes signify a health problem?

Changes in fingernail shape and color are common with age. However, certain changes—such as horizontal lines, nail pitting, and dark ridges beneath the nail—could signal a health issue and should be checked by a doctor. (Locked) More »

Looking for an earlier sign of Alzheimer’s disease

Symptoms of mild cognitive impairment can be an early marker of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. But new research has suggested there may be an even earlier clinical sign: subjective cognitive decline (SCD). SCD refers to a situation in which a person notices his thinking abilities are worsening, but standard memory tests can’t verify a decline. Since there is no test to diagnose SCD, the key is to increase self-awareness of changes in memory and consult a doctor as needed. (Locked) More »

Rethinking the 30-minute workout

Federal guidelines advocate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week for optimal health, which breaks down to 30 minutes, five days a week. People who have trouble finding the time for exercise can break down their 30-minute workouts into smaller segments throughout the day. Also, doing less than the required 150 weekly minutes can still offer significant health benefits compared with not doing any exercise. (Locked) More »

The art of pain therapy

Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses the creative process of art to address and work through emotional and physical issues, especially those related to chronic pain. Art therapy does not replace the need for pain medication, but it helps lower the perception of pain by moving people’s mental focus away from the painful stimulus, and teaching them how to relax and alter their mood, so the pain no longer controls them. (Locked) More »

Do you need a daily supplement?

About 70% of older adults use a daily supplement—either a daily multivitamin or individual vitamin or mineral. Supplements are helpful for people with diagnosed deficiencies, intestinal absorption problems, or certain medical issues that require higher intake of vitamins and minerals. Yet, for most healthy people, it is best to get required daily vitamins and minerals from food and not a pill. More »