How to sneak in more daily exercise

An estimated 67% of older adults report sitting for more than eight hours per day, and only 28% to 34% of adults ages 65 to 74 are physically active. U.S. guidelines suggest that adults get 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, which breaks down to 30 minutes on five days a week. While this can be a challenge for many older men, it’s possible to reach this weekly number by incorporating quick and simple body movements throughout the day. (Locked) More »

Should I get a bone density test?

Bone density tests are not routinely recommended for older men as there is no strong evidence they can benefit from osteoporosis-preventing medications. Lifestyle changes involving smoking, exercise, and alcohol intake can have the biggest impact on bone health. More »

Are cracking joints a sign of arthritis?

Q. My knees have been cracking for a long time, but lately I've noticed my ankles and elbows sometimes crack and pop. Is this a sign of early arthritis? A. The good news is that the usual painless joint cracking or popping does not represent an early form of arthritis, nor does it cause joint damage (despite what our mothers told us about cracking our knuckles). The cracking sound appears to come from tendons or muscles moving over the joint or from the popping of nitrogen bubbles normally found in the joint space. (Locked) More »

Sour mood getting you down? Get back to nature

Many men are at higher risk for mood disorders as they age, from dealing with sudden life changes like health issues, the loss of loved ones, and even the new world of retirement. If they do not want to turn to medication or therapy for help, men can find relief by interacting more with nature, whether by walking in the woods, listening to nature sounds, or even looking at pictures of soothing outdoor settings. More »

Can you be overweight and still be fit?

 Image: © FredFroese/Getty Images The idea that someone can be "fat and fit" — that is, overweight but still healthy — has been around for some time. But don't be fooled. "The latest science is quite clear that excess weight can carry considerable health risks, including a higher risk for heart attack and stroke," says Dr. Jorge Plutzky, director of preventive cardiology at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital. "While there is no one-size-fits-all number when it comes to a person's ideal weight, men should not ignore significant weight gain and the implications it has for their future health." (Locked) More »

Can diet heal chronic pain?

Chronic pain is often the result of chronic inflammation, and the evidence is quite strong that a person’s diet can contribute to inflammation as well as help to reduce it. Research has found that the best way to control inflammation and help ease chronic pain is to reduce amounts of known inflammatory foods, like processed “junk” foods, and eat a variety of foods that can strengthen the immune system, which helps keep inflammation under control. (Locked) More »

Save your skin from cancer

Cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) skin cancers have more than doubled over the past decade, especially among men. However, BCC and SCC are rarely deadly and are easy to treat if they are caught early. It is also easy to lower your risk by following standard sun protection practices, including using proper sunscreen, avoiding the sun during peak exposure times, and wearing sun protection clothing and hats. (Locked) More »

Heart trouble in your family? Exercise may offer protection

People who have a family history of heart disease can lower their risk if they exercise more. Researchers found that people in this group who scored the highest in physical activity, grip strength, and cardiovascular fitness had a lower risk of heart attack and stroke compared with those in the group who scored lowest. More »

Extra protein does not build more muscle

While it might seem natural to think that increasing protein intake could help improve muscle strength and performance, a new study confirmed that taking in more than the Recommended Dietary Allowance did not improve lean body mass, muscle performance, or physical function among older men. More »