What to do about mild cognitive impairment

Everyone has occasional bouts of forgetfulness, but if these episodes become frequent or interfere with daily life, it may be a sign of mild cognitive impairment, or MCI—a stage between the usual cognitive decline of normal aging and more serious dementia. While there is no single proven method for preventing or slowing MCI, research has found that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by eating right, exercising, and perhaps enlisting in an MCI-focused clinical trial. (Locked) More »

Crave a better appetite

It is common for appetite to decline with age because of loss of taste buds and sense of smell, chewing problems, medication side effects, and gastrointestinal issues. These problems can change men’s eating habits, leading them to move away from healthier foods to ones that can increase their risk of high cholesterol high blood pressure and diabetes. Changing how men approach meals and meal making and addressing medical concerns can often help increase their appetite for healthier fare. (Locked) More »

Help for hemorrhoids

More than 75% of people ages 45 and older have hemorrhoids, and many of them develop symptoms, such as rectal pain, itching, and bleeding after a bowel movement. The good news is that they are rarely dangerous and often shrink on their own when aided by simple self-help and over-the-counter remedies. However, some hemorrhoids may need to be removed with in-office procedures or minor surgery. More »

Feel the beat of heart rate training

Guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. A good way to maintain moderate intensity is with heart rate training, in which a person exercises at 60% to 75% of maximum heart rate. By wearing a heart rate monitor while exercising, a person can have a constant reminder of exercise intensity, so he or she can stay in the moderate-intensity zone as much as possible. (Locked) More »

Roll away muscle pain

Muscle soreness can become a regular part of daily life as a person ages. If aches and tightness interfere with daily living, adopting a foam rolling routine can help. Foam rollers can address common problem area like calves, hamstrings, lower back, and IT (iliotibial) bands. The roller glides over muscles much like a rolling pin to knead out knots, and it’s firm enough to apply sufficient pressure to address deep spots. (Locked) More »