Is it time to rethink how much you drink?

Contrary to popular belief, moderate alcohol use might not benefit cardiovascular health, especially for people who are 65 and older. People also often miscalculate what counts as a single drink and don’t recognize that many mixed drinks contain more than one serving of alcohol. In addition, they may not appreciate that alcohol affects people differently with increasing age. Tips for cutting back on alcohol include limiting drinking to restaurants and social occasions and diluting wine or cocktails with sparkling water and ice. More »

Target heart rate on a beta blocker

People who take beta blockers (which lower the heart rate and blood pressure) may not be able to reach their target heart rate during exercise. Instead, they can use the perceived exertion scale to assess how hard they’re exercising. (Locked) More »

Winter weather warning

Winter weather, especially when it’s windy or snowy, may pose an extra challenge for people with heart disease. Low temperatures constrict blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the heart. Shoveling snow, which can be more strenuous than running on a treadmill, increases the risk of heart attack. People who have or are at risk of heart disease should take precautions in cold weather, such as wearing a hat and gloves and dressing in layers to help maintain a steady body temperature before going outdoors. (Locked) More »

Dealing with the discomfort of angina

Angina pectoris is often defined as chest pain due to an inadequate supply of oxygen to the heart muscle. But most people describe the feeling as a sense of heaviness or pressure. It can also cause discomfort in the neck, jaw, and shoulders. Anything that increases blood flow to the heart, including exercise or periods of intense emotion, can trigger angina. Unstable angina (which is a medical emergency) occurs during rest or slight exertion. A number of medications can help ease angina. (Locked) More »

Take a breather

Focused, deep breathing may help people manage stress, which can lower their risk of heart disease. Two popular techniques include alternate-nostril breathing and diaphragmatic or belly breathing. Both techniques have been shown to decrease blood pressure and increase heart rate variability, a measure of the variation in time between heartbeats. A high heart rate variability, which suggests greater flexibility and resilience, is linked to a healthier, longer life. (Locked) More »

When the heart beats too slowly

Bradycardia, defined as a heart rate is below 60 beats per minute, is common in older adults, usually after age 70. Most people don’t experience symptoms, but those who do may feel dizzy, lightheaded, fatigued, breathless, or confused, and may faint. The condition may result from normal, age-related degeneration of the sinoatrial node, the heart’s natural pacemaker. Another underlying cause is a problem with the atrioventricular node, located in the center of the heart. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Chickpeas

Also known as garbanzo beans, chickpeas are featured in an array of dishes throughout the world, including Africa, India, the Middle East, and Europe. Several studies have found that eating chickpeas may improve cholesterol levels and reduce blood sugar. More »