Updated exercise guidelines showcase the benefits to your heart and beyond

The 2018 exercise guidelines say that even short bouts of activity lasting just a few minutes can count toward the recommended goal of 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. The steepest drop in heart disease risk occurs at the lowest, initial levels of activity. In addition, a single bout of exercise seems to confer immediate benefits in four factors linked to heart health, including blood pressure, anxiety, insulin sensitivity, and sleep. More »

Lead and heart disease: An underappreciated link?

According to a growing body of evidence, the presence of even a small amount of lead in a person's blood may raise the risk of heart disease. Studies have found that increases in blood pressure are associated with higher bone lead levels, and it may also raise LDL cholesterol and contribute to blood clots. Public health initiatives have resulted in a reduction in exposure, but lead remains present in our lives. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Black beans

Black beans are popular throughout Latin America as well as in the United States, thanks in part to the proliferation of fast-casual Mexican restaurants that feature black beans on their menus. More »

A more personalized approach to treating high cholesterol

Nearly one in three American adults has high levels of LDL, the most harmful type of cholesterol. The 2018 cholesterol treatment guidelines now take a more personalized approach on the best way to manage this common problem. As in the past, the new guidelines recommend an LDL-lowering statin drug for anyone who has already had a heart attack or (in most cases) a stroke. Adults ages 40 t0 75 who don’t have heart disease but who have diabetes and an LDL of 70 or higher should take a statin; so should anyone with an extremely high LDL (190 mg/dL or higher). (Locked) More »

Prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids to prevent heart disease?

A prescription drug called icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) that contains large doses of EPA (an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil) lowers high blood levels of triglycerides. For some people, it also may reduce heart attacks, strokes, and related events. Triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, have been getting more attention of late for their role in heart disease. But the heart-protecting benefits of icosapent ethyl may also arise from calming inflammation, making blood less likely to clot, and preventing dangerous heart rhythms. (Locked) More »

The danger of “silent” heart attacks

Most people don’t realize that they could have a heart attack without even knowing it. Although these are known as “silent” heart attacks, a more accurate term may be “unrecognized” heart attack: people have symptoms but do not recognize them as coming from their heart. In the long run, these unrecognized heart attacks might be just as dangerous as recognized heart attacks. (Locked) More »