Time to try intermittent fasting?

If you need to lose weight, a diet that focuses mainly on when (not what) you eat may be a good way to shed pounds and improve your cardiovascular health.

Published: July, 2020

Anyone who's tried different weight-loss diets is probably familiar with their pitfalls. Low-calorie diets often leave you tired, hungry, and cranky. Low-carb or "keto" diets can cause cravings and constipation. Low-fat diets are also tough to follow and, contrary to popular belief, they do not seem to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Another diet trend, intermittent fasting, takes a different approach. Rather than limiting what you eat, this diet limits when you eat (see "What is intermittent fasting?"). For some people, that change may be easier to manage, says Dr. Eric Rimm, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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