Recent Blog Articles

Cancer

This just in: Exercise is good for you

iStock-626123946-Copy
July 20, 2017

Disclaimer:

As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review or update on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

Comments

Othman
August 13, 2017

Hello,
My name is Othman, a retired Professional 400m athlete, you stated that those who bike have 50% less chance of developing some disease, and those who walk has less chance than that… and that completely normal; because biking burn more calories than walking without hurting your tissues or heart
To reach the best possible outcome, one has to practice something that help you burn the maximum calorie excess without getting.
as a professional athlete I can say that, swimming for one hour 3 times a week is the best or 1h jog, 3 times a week, or 10km biking twice a week… walking or jogging for 20 minutes or some weight lifting, can help of course but it’s nothing compared to what I stated above…
Also notice that one, have to eat healthy sleep well, and take some supplementation in case of any deficiency, as an example, is a very powerful and natural supplement, that can boost your energy and whole body health.
Also eating too much calories especially during the night can make your liver suffer and transform that excess to a liver fat…
Thank you for this article.
Othman

Arthur J Siegel M.D.
July 24, 2017

Beyondaddressing “how much” exercise is beneficial,
HHB readers should also consider ” how much is too much!”.
As quintessential examples of pursuing optimal heart health, long distance runners especially are advised to consider:
‘Can pre-race aspirin prevent sudden cardiac death during marathons?’
Arthur J Siegel M.D., Timothy J Noakes, M. D.
an editorial in the current British Journal of Sports Medicine, which is free online worldwide.

PETER ATKINSON
July 21, 2017

In 1974, While I was studying for my Thai medical exams I came across a book in Sirirat Hospital library that contained dozens of studies from animals to clerks and postmen to longshoremen with different physical work loads. Together these studies showed indisputably that exercise prevents degenerative diseases and prolongs life. 43 years later you produce the same results. We also know what foods are good for us and what are bad. Why is preventive health not a mandated subject in all schools. This could cut billions off the amount spent in lost work and hospital treatment. Isn’t this as important as, say, history?

Dennis
July 22, 2017

I agree to the suggestion that preventive health should be included in school subjects beginning from High school. Very important.

Commenting has been closed for this post.

Harvard Health Publishing Logo

Thanks for visiting. Don't miss your FREE gift.

The Best Diets for Cognitive Fitness, is yours absolutely FREE when you sign up to receive Health Alerts from Harvard Medical School

Sign up to get tips for living a healthy lifestyle, with ways to fight inflammation and improve cognitive health, plus the latest advances in preventative medicine, diet and exercise, pain relief, blood pressure and cholesterol management, and more.

Harvard Health Publishing Logo

Health Alerts from Harvard Medical School

Get helpful tips and guidance for everything from fighting inflammation to finding the best diets for weight loss...from exercises to build a stronger core to advice on treating cataracts. PLUS, the latest news on medical advances and breakthroughs from Harvard Medical School experts.

BONUS! Sign up now and
get a FREE copy of the
Best Diets for Cognitive Fitness

Harvard Health Publishing Logo

Stay on top of latest health news from Harvard Medical School.

Plus, get a FREE copy of the Best Diets for Cognitive Fitness.