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Think running is not for you? Try this

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April 15, 2020
  • By: Matthew Solan, Executive Editor, Harvard Men's Health Watch

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Comments

Gordon
April 25, 2020

3 years ago, in my early 50’s, I weighed in at 140kg and got out of breath walking, let alone running! I did precisely what was described in this article. Started walking, interspersed with very short runs. What I found worked for me, was committing to a certain amount of time and gradually increasing the intensity (not more than 10% increments) within the same timeframe. I also deliberately included gradient in my routes and focused running up hills, as this increased the resistance. Today I am keeping my weight under 90kg, running 50km – 75km a week and regularly competing in half marathon trails and road marathons. As a regular traveller, I make a point of running in every city I visit and have found it is a great way to discover new places. Let me add however, it was hard work at the beginning. I had to believe that running was good for me and that with time it would get easier and it took almost a year to reach a point where I could honestly admit to missing the activity when I couldn’t run. Investing in good shoes for different surfaces (I use ATR’s for trail running and regular road shoes for marathons) and mixing up surfaces, have both contributed to minimal injury. Whatever you choose to do, I cannot advocate more for spending time on your feet!

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