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Lifestyle change as precision medicine

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Published: August 09, 2018

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Comments

Sharon Kidwell
September 19, 2018

I’ll tell you about adrenal failure which is something I’ve had to some degree all of m y life. My body shut down, reason, memory, digestion and blood pressure which at its lowest was something like 35 over 40. Although I didn’t really forget, I couldn’t access what I did know. I was very isolated because I couldn’t put sentences together to maintain a conversation. I had two two nasty stomach infections brought on by stress. I’d see things that weren’t there. I couldn’t decide what to do with common things that I’d known all my life. Fortunately, I wasn’t the first case of adrenal malfunction that my nutrition response doctor had seen.
It has taken two years and I’m probably 90% O.K. Medical doctors aren’t going to admit this condition exists because they have no resources for treating it.

Francisco Tostes
September 14, 2018

Marcelo, parabéns pelo texto. Abraço!

Marcelo Campos
August 20, 2018

Hi Dana, listen to your body first. We do have simple tests we can use to measure wellbeing. Weight, Waist-to-hip ratio, Blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol levels, just to name a few that we typically do in the doctor’s office. Another way to track wellbeing is to check Heart Rate Variability. You can get to know a little more about this here.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/heart-rate-variability-new-way-track-well-2017112212789

I hope this helps

Avid reader
August 15, 2018

Azure, I just wanted tone shour “hallelujah ” when I read your post.! Well said.

Patricia Wightman Wortelboer
August 14, 2018

I am an MD and Psychologist in Argentina and LMHC for FL. I have retired from my post in the National Training Center for Elite athletes , but we are right now preparing for the Youth Olympic Games 2018 so I work as hard as ever. Personalized Medicine is the only way to maintain precision health and this is most important when you need to get good sport results. With my own body I have found that that special care and dedication is essential to being able to continue playing good tennis!! Love your posts and I am a great Twitter for you.

tzatz
August 12, 2018

This is exactly what I needed to read right now. I have been struggling with a stressful lifestyle for years but for the past couple of them my body has been alarming me to the need to change. I have spent the past months taking steps to lifestyle change and it gives me great encouragement to read that somehow this is a good starting point..

azure
August 10, 2018

“In a world where we expect personalized products and services delivered promptly to our screens and doors, ” We do? Just who is this “we”? I sure don’t. My experience is that marketers/advertisers, clothing manufacturers, airlines, et al, all try to fit individuals into standardized clothing, seats, treatment, etc.

Advertising is ostensibly “personalized”–yet it’s very easy overall to make online marketing offer stuff you don’t want, since it “notices” terms/words frequently used. Maybe there’s an appearance of “personalization” because people allow so much of their data to be collected.

Let me know when made-to-measure clothing becomes affordable for everyone in the US and when standard health care providers actually have time to listen to each one of us at every visit.

Heidi Creighton
August 10, 2018

Very insightful item; thank you for writing this piece that gets at the root of preventative approaches to health and well being.

Dana
August 09, 2018

This is a great post!
It’s consistent with a lot of other studies about how what we eat and how we take care of our bodies directly correlates to illness and our overall immune system.
How would you suggest we best monitor our pain/ailments against the different types of lifestyle changes?
Are there tools to keep track of the improvements we might observe?

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