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Harvard Health Ad Watch: A new treatment for knee arthritis

November 25, 2019

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Comments

s
October 20, 2019

Great analysis. Thanks for that. Ads tend to overrate many treatments and give “nearly accurate” information. We are looking for clear cut yes/no treatments and can’t handle the gray area of not enough trusted data.

Padma
October 19, 2019

Good story, thank you. Training in the gym has been my life for 40 years.But thanks to ACL injuries and osteo-arthritis, life’s getting tough for me. And there are too many ‘remedies’ on offer. A discerning article helps.

Kathryn
October 18, 2019

A morbidly obese acquaintance of mine just received something similar for which her insurance paid $70,000. I wonder what her back pain would have been like had she lost the 150 lbs she needed to lose in order to have an almost normal BMI. In a society where we hear that children are not going to be able to get life saving drugs, WHEN do we start telling fat people with bad knees to LOSE the weight first and then we try these high tech, expensive, riskier, and potentially short term interventions.

azure
October 26, 2019

Shaming overweight people about their weight (and there can be many reasons someone doesn’t weigh what you think he or she should) won’t mean more children will get the medication they need. Not how the US medical care system works. I’ve met people whose weight is at the currently accepted “healthy” weight who have multiple medical problems, some of their own making, some not.

Giovanni A. Silva
October 18, 2019

Quite incredible that this procedure is even a consideration.
Nerve ablation in ANY part of the body should be considered archaic at best..
“Numbing” or actually trying to kill a nerve to prevent normal signaling to the brain to let the patient know that something bad is going on in that particular body part, should be a crime.
How can ANY clinician think that killing a nerve is a solution? The affected joint(s) will only continue to degenerate but now only at a much faster rate as the patient has now no gauge that’s telling the brain to stop the irritant.
There are many other options that the patient should be made aware of that are more efficacious for arthritis of any joint(s) and for other chronic pain syndromes.
It is up to the clinician to open their minds and explore and do the research and find the options available to educate their patients.

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