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Digesting the latest research on eggs

man-looking-at-egg-on-plate
July 03, 2019

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Comments

Thom Smothers
July 10, 2019

Just an innocent bystander who happens to like eggs. My grandparents ate eggs, pork products and biscuits made with lard every day of their lives. Also 2 cups of coffee for breakfast, water nearly all the rest. They were farmers as well as their parents before them on both sides. She died at 94, she had 7 kids and worked in the fields sometimes while pregnant . My grandfather died at 84, neither died from cancer or heart disease. Her Dad and oldest brothers lived to be 99 and 97 living on the same diet. They did raise big gardens with loads of tomatoes and okra, and loved butter beans and green beans. She canned also. So you can see why I find it highly suspect to believe eggs can be that bad for you.

Sandra Larson
July 07, 2019

No one needs eggs! The negatives associated with eating eggs far outweighs any positive. Avoiding eggs and other animal products (full of fat, cholesterol, animal hormones and other harmful toxins) is one of the best things you can do for your health! There are much better sources of protein (beans, greens, grains, nuts), and all the other nutrients in eggs can be obtained easily from healthier foods.

Nutrition expert Dr. Michael Greger has many excellent online videos that share recent global scientific research studies on the negative effects of egg consumption, particularly as it relates to cholesterol. Fascinating videos and research! Highly recommend reading his articles on eggs and watching his many short videos on the topic. The conclusion: Avoid eggs!

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) is creating awareness as well, about the detrimental effects of eggs to our health.

Here is their article:
“The Incredibly Inedible Egg”

“A recent question in The New York Times Well blog created some confusion by asking how many eggs you can (or should) eat. The answer was not eggs-actly correct.

“Since one egg has the same amount of cholesterol as a BIG MAC, it is unnecessary—even DETRIMENTAL to your health—to consume eggs or egg products. One egg has more CHOLESTEROL than your body needs. In fact, any added dietary cholesterol is unnecessary because our bodies already produce more than the amount we require. An excess of cholesterol leads to HEART DISEASE, so it’s no surprise that a 2010 study in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology found that those who consume the most eggs have a 19 percent increased risk for cardiovascular problems.

“What The New York Times blog fails to explain is that eating an occasional egg might not increase health risks for people already eating a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet—just as smoking an occasional cigar might not increase health risks for people already smoking cigarettes. But if people are already eating a healthful diet without any added dietary cholesterol, eggs can contribute to many problems in addition to heart disease. Recent studies in Atherosclerosis and the International Journal of Cancer show that egg consumption can also cause DIABETES and even CANCER…

“No matter what you call it, egg-free is the better option.”

dean reinke
July 04, 2019

But this Finnish study.
Dietary cholesterol or egg consumption do not increase the risk of stroke, Finnish study finds. What to believe?

Kate Elish
July 08, 2019

Harvard and Dr. Greger, who Sandra Larson mentions, conduct rigorous research and reviews, respectively, and both of these sources have demonstrated repeatedly the health dangers of eggs. Care to elaborate on this “Finnish” study (title, who it was sponsored by, sources, etc., etc.)? I eat eggs occasionally, but I refuse to convince myself that eggs are a healthy choice if science has demonstrated otherwise.

Regards,

Kate

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