Cholesterol deposits in the skin

Cholesterol is best known for its tendency to accumulate in the inner lining of arteries. In some people, though, it can also appear in small deposits in the skin. When these yellowish deposits form around the eyes, they are known as xanthelasma. The presence of a xanthelasma seems to signal that an individual is at increased risk of developing heart disease. Here is an image of what the deposits look like: (Locked) More »

March 2011 references and further reading

Patel M, Kim M, Karajgikar R, et al. Outcomes of patients discharged the same day following percutaneous coronary intervention. JACC Cardiovascular Interventions 2010; 3:851-8. Chambers CE, Dehmer GJ, Cox DA, et al. Defining the length of stay following percutaneous coronary intervention: an expert consensus document from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 2009; 73:847-58. Schermerhorn ML, O'Malley AJ, Jhaveri A, Cotterill P, Pomposelli F, Landon BE. Endovascular vs. open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the Medicare population. New England Journal of Medicine 2008; 358:464-74. (Locked) More »

11 ways to prevent stroke

Some risk factors for stroke, such as family history and ethnicity, cannot be changed, but attention to factors like weight, blood pressure, cholesterol, and physical activity can significantly reduce stroke risk. Here are 11 things you can do to stay stroke-free: (Locked) More »

Fish oil questioned as treatment for heart disease

Results of several studies suggest that taking fish oil does not benefit people who already have some form of heart disease, but eating fish is still likely to offer health benefits to most people. It could fight other types of cardiovascular disease or problems like depression. And it is a good treatment for high triglycerides. More »

Hybrid heart surgery expands options

Heart problems tend to come in clumps. Arteries clog. Valves don't open or close all the way. The heart's rhythm becomes irregular. Many people face not one but two or more treatment decisions. Just a few years ago, someone who required multiple cardiac procedures might have had separate procedures done by specialists working in different parts of a hospital. This fragmented approach to care is starting to change. People who need more than one type of heart procedure may be able to have them done in a hybrid operating suite, reducing risk and some recovery times. (Locked) More »

Transfusion and heart surgery: Only when needed

The practice of routinely giving blood transfusions to patients during and after heart surgery is being challenged by research findings. In an eye-opening British study published in 2007, people who received a transfusion during or after heart surgery were six times more likely to have developed a complication related to ischemia (insufficient oxygen delivery to the tissues), such as heart attack, stroke, kidney trouble, and even death, when compared with those who did not get a transfusion.  (Locked) More »

Stay lean, live longer

Despite studies that suggested those who gain weight with age might live longer, having a body mass index in the normal range still correlates with a lower death rate. (Locked) More »