June 2011 references and further reading

Markel H. "When it rains it pours": endemic goiter, iodized salt, and David Murray Cowie, MD. American Journal of Public Health 1987; 77:219-29. Dasgupta PK, Liu Y, Dyke JV. Iodine nutrition: iodine content of iodized salt in the United States. Environmental Science and Technology 2008; 42:1315-23. Tayie FA, Jourdan K. Hypertension, dietary salt restriction, and iodine deficiency among adults. American Journal of Hypertension 2010; 23:1095-102. (Locked) More »

Cut salt - it won't affect your iodine intake

Concern about sodium intake has raised the question of whether cutting back on salt could put people in danger of not getting enough iodine, but this should not be a cause for concern. Between 75% and 90% of sodium in the average American's diet comes from prepared or processed food, and most food companies don't use iodized salt. The so-called hidden salt in processed food is a great place to start trimming sodium from your diet, and cutting back on it will have little effect on your iodine intake. More »

Specialized care improves stroke survival

Care at a specialized center may provide a better chance of surviving a stroke, even if it requires extra travel time to reach. A study of almost 31,000 New York State residents treated for ischemic stroke suggests that those who received care at a primary stroke center were 2.5% more likely to survive than those who received care at other hospitals.  (Locked) More »

Weight-loss surgery can help - and harm - the heart

It's important for readers to understand that although weight-loss surgery tends to improve heart health in the long run, in the short term the operation places a tremendous strain on the heart. Heart attacks and other cardiac problems account for as many as one in five post-surgery deaths. This likely reflects years of obesity-related damage to the heart and blood vessels. (Locked) More »

Who needs an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator?

Thousands of people receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators each year, but not everyone who receives the device really needs it, and some people would be better off pursuing other treatment avenues. Two studies showed that 13% of people who receive ICDs may not need them, at least not according to the strict criteria outlined in professional guidelines. Here is a summary of the most current national guidelines on who does, who might, and who doesn't need an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD).  (Locked) More »

In Brief

Brief reports on hypertension statistics, a theory about why some people show more of an HDL cholesterol benefit from exercise than others, and more about the connection between depression and heart disease. (Locked) More »