Harvard Heart Letter

From irritated to enraged: Anger's toxic effect on the heart

The effect is small and short-lived, but anger can trigger a heart attack, stroke, or risky heart rhythm.

Have you ever been so angry that it "made your blood boil"? In fact, anger can trigger physiological changes that affect your blood, temporarily elevating your risk of a heart attack or related problem. Research shows that in the two hours after an angry outburst, a person has a slightly higher risk of having chest pain (angina), a heart attack, a stroke, or a risky heart rhythm.

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