Erectile Dysfunction

Men with erectile dysfunction, once called impotence, have trouble getting or sustaining an erection long enough to have sex. It's a common condition, affecting as many as 30 million American men. Erectile dysfunction affects older men more than younger men. About 1% of men in their 40s, 17% of men in their 60s, and nearly 50% of men 75 or older aren't able to achieve an erection sufficient for intercourse.

Sometimes erectile dysfunction develops gradually. One night it may take longer or require more stimulation to get an erection. Another time, an erection may not be as firm as usual, or it may end before orgasm. When such difficulties occur regularly, it's time to talk to a doctor.

The culprit behind erectile dysfunction is often clogged arteries. In fact, in nearly one-third of men who see their doctors about trouble getting or keeping an erection, erectile dysfunction is the first hint that they have cardiovascular disease. Other possible causes of erectile dysfunction include medications and prostate surgery, as well as illnesses and accidents. Stress, relationship problems, or depression can also lead to it.

Regardless of the cause, erectile dysfunction often can be effectively treated. For some men, simply losing weight may help. Others may need medications. If these steps aren’t effective, a number of other options, including injections and vacuum devices, are available. Given the variety of options, the possibility of finding the right solution is now greater than ever before.

Erectile Dysfunction Articles

Erectile dysfunction drugs not linked to melanoma

Although a recent study suggested an association between erectile dysfunction drugs, such as sildenafil (Viagra), and melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer, the researchers concluded the elevated risk is likely due to other factors, like sunlight exposure. More »

Not satisfied with your sex life?

Erectile dysfunction usually stems from inadequate blood supply to the penis, but other causes can contribute. Diagnosing it and getting the right treatment requires a frank conversation with a doctor about your sexual function. Full sexual function requires sufficient arousal before intercourse. The most widely used drugs for erectile problems work in most men, but insurance coverage is limited, and they have potential side effects. (Locked) More »

Erectile dysfunction and the drugs to treat it

Erectile dysfunction is diagnosed when a man has difficulty attaining and sustaining an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse. Prescription medications are the first line of treatment. All of the drugs need to be taken about an hour before activity, on an empty stomach. Some drugs may work in half an hour or less. Excessive alcohol use may reduce the effect of the drug. (Locked) More »

An option for low-risk prostate cancer

After prostate cancer diagnosis, many men choose immediate treatment with surgery or radiation. But immediate treatment is not the only option. Some men with early low-risk prostate cancers can choose to hold off on the decision to treat until the disease presents a greater threat. At that later date, the cancer can still be treated effectively. The approach is called active surveillance with delayed intention to treat. Bothersome and potentially permanent side effects of treatment include erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. By choosing active surveillance, some men can avoid the risks of treating a cancer that may be unlikely to cause them serious harm within their lifespan. (Locked) More »