Hot flashes and heart health

Results of a recent study suggest a link between frequent and persistent hot flashes and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. However, even among women who had more hot flashes, the overall odds of having a heart-related event was still low. Since most women experience hot flashes around the time of menopause, more research is needed to better define the frequency and severity of hot flashes that would warrant extra attention to cardiovascular risk. (Locked) More »

Is bladder training really beneficial?

Bladder training is a strategy that people suffering from urinary frequency or overactive bladder might try to improve their condition. It involves urinating on a schedule, gradually extending the time between bathroom visits, to improve bladder function. More »

Can I do anything to prevent osteoporosis?

Many risk factors for osteoporosis, such as sex, age, and genes, are not modifiable. But women at risk can make changes to improve bone health, such as not smoking and limiting alcohol consumption, exercising more, and adopting a healthy diet rich in calcium and getting enough vitamin D. More »

Can supplements help boost your immune system?

There’s no evidence that products that claim to boost or support immune function actually do so. In fact, a wholesale boost to the immune system could lead to autoimmune or autoinflammatory conditions. To protect health, adopt good health habits such as cleaning your hands frequently, reducing stress, getting vaccinated when possible, and maintaining a healthy diet. More »

Hair thinning? Get to the root of the problem

Female hair loss is a common problem. Causes of hair loss in women range from pregnancy and hormonal shifts to genetic causes or illness. Some hair loss is also caused by overuse of styling products and tools. Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause, but can include everything from medication to hair transplant surgery. (Locked) More »

Hormones and breast cancer: What you should know

Hormone therapy is linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. A new study shows that risk is higher with both estrogen-only hormone therapy and progesterone-estrogen combination therapy. In addition, women who take hormones for a longer time have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. If a woman opts to take hormone therapy, it should be for as short a period as possible to manage symptoms. (Locked) More »

FDA approves new migraine medication

The FDA approved a new treatment, called lasmiditan (Reyvow), to treat migraine headaches. The pill is designed to relieve pain from migraines with or without an aura in adults. It is not designed to prevent migraines. More »