Finding hidden risk for heart disease

Most men are familiar with the common factors related to a higher heart disease risk, like cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, poor diet, and inadequate exercise. But there are other signs of risk men may not recognize, such as erectile dysfunction, abdominal fat, gum disease, and depression. The good news is that once these issues are recognized, they can be addressed and managed. (Locked) More »

Why has my sense of taste changed?

Losing some sense of taste often happens with older age, but you should consider what else might be causing it. Blocked nasal passages from allergies or a sinus infection and even one of your medications might be a factor. Addressing these issues with your doctor, including switching to a different drug, may help. (Locked) More »

How long should I wait after the flu before resuming exercise?

Q. I have just recovered from the flu. How soon can I resume exercise again and can I go straight back to my previous routine? A. The recommendations about when to return to exercise after respiratory infections, such as the flu, colds, or bronchitis, are vague. One major reason is that each person's response to illness is so variable. But here is my general advice. Most healthy people who have a cold or mild bronchitis without a fever or significant cough can continue to exercise during their illness. However, you initially want to cut your intensity and duration in half. If you feel good later in the day after your lighter workout, you can gradually increase how much you do during your next session. But if you feel exhausted after exercising, take off an extra day before working out again. More »

Putting a stop to leaky gut

Leaky gut occurs when holes in the gut lining allow toxins and bacteria to enter the body, and may contribute to symptoms like bloating, gas, cramps, food sensitivities, fatigue, and headaches. While leaky gut remains a mysterious ailment and is often tough to diagnose, investing in overall digestive health, including eating a diet with unprocessed foods and adequate fiber intake, and adopting regular exercise can help keep the digestive system healthy. More »

Tips to remember

Occasional memory lapses are upsetting, but unfortunately are a natural part of aging. These changes can slow certain cognitive processes, which makes it more difficult at times to learn and recall new and existing information. These minor memory lapses are often not a sign of Alzheimer’s disease, and there are ways for older adults to sharpen their everyday memory to help retain just-learned information. More »

The pain of measuring pain

The 10-point pain scale has been used for decades to help patients communicate pain levels to their doctors, but a more thorough approach is a multi-tier method. This includes placing pain into different categories like mild, moderate, and severe, with some levels of degree under each one, as well as describing the pain and explaining its location, severity, duration, and specific qualities. (Locked) More »

The wonders of winter workouts

Exercising in cold weather may have some special benefits people don’t always get in summer, such as improved endurance and protection against seasonal affective disorder. While cold-weather exercise is usually safe, people should first check with their doctor, especially if they have conditions like asthma or heart problems. Also, they should take extra care during workouts, such as wearing protective clothing, choosing safe spots to exercise, and making sure to hydrate. More »

Writing a thank-you note is more powerful than you think

Image: Janice Richard/Getty Images Writing thank-you notes is not just good manners. It can have a strong psychological effect for both the sender and receiver, suggests research published in the September 2018 issue of Psychological Science.  While most people consider showing an expression of gratitude a nice gesture, many people struggle to do it. To find out why, researchers from the University of Texas asked 334 people to write a letter of gratitude to someone who'd done something nice for them and then to guess the recipient's reaction in several categories. More »