Lift weights to boost muscle

Men naturally lose muscle mass as they age—as much as 3% to 5% per decade after age 30. Weaker muscles mean less stamina, balance and mobility, all which increase a person’s risk for falls and fractures. Strength training, using either free weights like dumbbells, kettlebells, and barbells or weight machines that are designed to work specific muscle groups, can help men maintain and even add muscle. More »

Does drinking coffee offer health benefits?

Drinking regular coffee is linked with lower rates of diseases and a longer life span, although science still cannot provide solid evidence for its potential benefit. Still, enjoying a daily cup or two does not present any major risks, although a person should be careful about consuming too much caffeine from coffee, as high amounts can lead to acid reflux and a rapid heart rate. (Locked) More »

Are colon cancer screenings necessary after a certain age?

Routine colon cancer screening is often not recommended for men over age 75 unless they have had precancerous polyps before or have a family history of colon cancer. However, men should consider having a colonoscopy at least once, even after age 75, if they have never had one. (Locked) More »

Don’t fear pacemakers

The likelihood of needing a pacemaker increases with age, but it is no longer the scary device it once was. Pacemakers have evolved from fixing irregular heartbeats to helping the heart mimic normal function, which can help many older men with certain heart conditions stay more active longer. (Locked) More »

Men (back) at work

A stronger social life is associated with a lower risk of heart disease and depression and greater immune function. Men often struggle with building social circles after they retire. Recreating the social structure of the workplace can help men stay socially active, boost thinking skills they may have left behind from work, and develop new friendships. (Locked) More »

Teaching T cells to fight cancer

Immunotherapy, one of the fastest-growing cancer treatments, helps the immune system better target and kill cancer cells by focusing only on the cancerous cells while sparing the healthy ones. One of the most innovative immunology therapies is chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, which is custom-made for individuals and their specific cancer. It can be an alternative for people who are resistant to chemotherapy, or diseases that don’t respond well to the treatment. (Locked) More »

Medical marijuana: Know the facts

Even though medical marijuana has been approved in 28 states and the District of Columbia, in-depth human-based research is lacking. Some initial research has found it helpful for conditions like pain, glaucoma, and nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy, but science is still trying to connect the dots as to how, and if, it works. (Locked) More »

Positive outlook may mean better sleep

People who feel they have more meaning and purpose in life have fewer sleep problems. The connection could work two ways: people who feel good about their lives tend to be more proactive about maintaining good health, which is linked to better sleep, and people who battle issues that lower one’s outlook on life, like depression and heart disease, tend to have more sleeping problems. More »