Clearing the Fog of Cataracts

Clearing the Fog of Cataracts clears away the confusion and misinformation around cataracts. Discover the truth about whether you really need cataract surgery. Plus resources to find the right surgeon and a step-by-step guide to everything you need to know about surgery if you choose to have it. Even better, you’ll find out the secrets to preventing cataracts and maintaining your youthful vision at any age.

Clearing the Fog of Cataracts Cover

Are there times you notice your vision is blurry… and you worry it could be cataracts?

Vision loss is a scary thing. It can mean more accidents, having trouble with everyday tasks, and even the loss of your precious independence.

And, yes, cataract surgery is an option. It’s got a great success rate and few complications. But who really wants to go under the knife? Especially when it comes to your delicate eyes?

Well, here’s great news. Even if you develop cataracts, there are simple steps you can take to continue to live an independent and active life without surgery. And, better yet, proven ways to never develop cataracts in the first place… and hold on to your sharp vision at any age. Now Harvard doctors reveal all the startling facts about cataracts in the Harvard Medical School Guide Clearing the Fog of Cataracts.  

Cataract surgery can restore your crystal clear eyesight. But is it right for you?

Believe it or not, even if you’re diagnosed with cataracts, you may never need surgery. Now you can discover how to delay or even “skip” surgery with simple at-home solutions.

You’ll also find out everything you need to know if you decide surgery is necessary, including how to find the right surgeon, how to prepare for surgery, and how to speed up your recovery and get back to your life faster. Best of all, you’ll discover how to prevent cataracts and make sure your eyes stay clear, sharp, and healthy… even if you live to 120!

In this Harvard Medical School Guide, you’ll find out the latest, proven solutions including:

  • The 5-step solution to catching cataracts early, before they damage your vision
  • Why quitting this bad habit has the little-known bonus benefit of lifelong razor-sharp eyesight
  • The 1 artificial lens you want to avoid at all costs if you want to drive at night
  • The “eagle eyes diet” that will keep you cataract-free
  • 5 questions to ask your surgeon to get the best results
  • When you should only have surgery on one eye, and how to avoid it for the other eye completely
  • And much more!

Clearing the Fog of Cataracts clears away the confusion and misinformation around cataracts. Discover the truth about whether you really need cataract surgery. Plus resources to find the right surgeon and a step-by-step guide to everything you need to know about surgery if you choose to have it. Even better, you’ll find out the secrets to preventing cataracts and maintaining your youthful, clear vision at any age.

If you’re concerned about developing cataracts or you’ve already been diagnosed, be sure to order Clearing the Fog of Cataracts today!

  • What are cataracts?
  • A glimpse inside the eye
  • How cataracts affect your vision
  • Who gets cataracts?
  • Getting a diagnosis
    • Do you need surgery?
    • Coping with early cataracts
    • Timing your surgery
  • All about cataract surgery
    • Types of cataract surgery
    • Types of intraocular lenses
    • Preparing for cataract surgery
    • What to expect during cataract surgery
    • Risks and possible complications
  • Preventing cataracts
  • Resources

Cataract types

Cataracts come in three types: nuclear sclerotic, cortical, and posterior subcapsular. You may have just one of these types, or a combination of them.

Nuclear sclerotic cataracts are the age-related type of cataract that ophthalmologists see most often. They cloud the nucleus, or center of the lens, turning it yellow and then eventually a brown color. As the cataract darkens, it hardens. Sclerosis is a medical term for hardening.

Because nuclear sclerotic cataracts grow very slowly, several years might pass before you notice any changes to your vision. Distance vision is typically the first to fade. Close-up vision may improve temporarily, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as “second sight.” Eventually, the darkening of the lens will reduce your ability to distinguish details and colors.

Cortical cataracts create areas of clouding of the cortex, or outer layers, of the lens. The cloudy areas look like white spokes on a wheel. The spokes first appear at the edges of the lens
first appear at the edges of the lens under the iris and then extend into the center of the pupil. These white spokes scatter light.

Diabetes puts a person at especially high risk of this type of cataract. High blood sugar damages the lens over time, leading to the cortical spoking pattern of cloudiness.

The main symptoms are glare, which can make it hard to drive at night, and blurred vision. Glare may interfere with depth perception, making it hard for you to discern your distance from objects and people.

Posterior subcapsular cataracts form on the back surface (posterior) of the lens, just underneath the lens capsule, a clear membrane that surrounds the lens. This type of cataract causes halo effects and glare in bright sunlight or around lights in the dark. It grows worse much more quickly than the other cataract types—over a period of months rather than years. It may degrade vision drastically in some situations, but not in others. You’re more likely to have this type of cataract if you have diabetes or take steroid medicines.

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