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Heart Health

Prehypertension increases stroke risk

Checking-blood-pressure
Published: March 14, 2014
  • Author: Howard LeWine, M.D.,

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Comments

www.mbtukstore.com
May 04, 2014

your point of view that life style has a great affect on reducing Hypertension is absolutely correct. thanks for the post Dr.Howard

robot süpermeks
March 27, 2014

O my good

Dirk Sorbello
March 27, 2014

Hi, this weekend is good in support of me, since this moment i am reading this enormous educational piece of writing here at my residence.

Eyvette Turner
March 26, 2014

Thank you for this information on high blood pressure. I was diagnosed with hypertension and have since started a blog to help myself and others to lower our blood pressure.

I am looking to spread the word of all the best ways to reduce high blood pressure and to also use them myself.

I appreciate you article about helping me understand that lifestyle changes are the most important way to lower blood pressure.

Thanks!

Vince Miraglia
March 16, 2014

Some important facts are missing ;first while exercise and optimal weight are always desirable this statement ‘How bad can a little high blood pressure be? It turns out that it might be worse than we thought.’ really should be supported by absolute risk reduction rather than the fear provoking RR number; since we saw no data in the piece about reductions in mortality I suspect no significant difference existed.The same for heart attacks A recent review by Cochrane found little evidence that drug therapy for even mild hypertension had a significant effect
“Antihypertensive drugs used in the treatment of adults (primary prevention) with mild hypertension (systolic BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg) have not been shown to reduce mortality or morbidity in RCTs. Treatment caused 9% of patients to discontinue treatment due to adverse effects. More RCTs are needed in this prevalent population to know whether the benefits of treatment exceed the harms.

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